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I would like to create a template function that returns either int or std::vector<int> depending on a template parameter. For example:

struct ReturnInt {};
struct ReturnVec {};

[...]

int num = func<ReturnInt>();
std::vector<int> nums = func<ReturnVec>();

I've been attempting naively to implement this based on my very limited experience with TMP. I feel like it should involve something along the lines of explicit template specializations, std::enable_if, std::conditional, and/or SFINAE. But none of my attempts to code this will compile, let alone run in a simple test.

How would this return-type switching be implemented?

Edit: As noted in the comments, this is a simplification of my actual problem. If it helps, I have a class that accepts a template parameter. Depending on the parameter, I would like its get() method to return either a single object/value, or a standard container of objects/values.

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3  
Why do the functions need to be named the same, if they're not disambiguating based on parameter or anything like that? Treating the template specialization as part of the name just seems unnecessary. –  Kevin Ballard Sep 17 '12 at 3:01
    
This is a simplification of my actual problem. If it helps, I have a class that accepts a template parameter. Depending on the parameter, I would like its get() method to return either a single object/value, or a standard container of objects/values. –  Bret Kuhns Sep 17 '12 at 3:05
    
Have you looked at template specialization? –  Adrian Cornish Sep 17 '12 at 3:05
1  
@AdrianCornish: Sure, if you ignore his real problem and just blindly answer based on the title of the problem. Presumably if Bret could have used int and std::vector<int> as his template parameters he would have already done that. –  Kevin Ballard Sep 17 '12 at 3:16
1  
@AdrianCornish: Yes, because that's valid. You're missing the point. You can specialize foo<int> to have a return type of int. But you can't specialize foo<SomeArbitraryType> to have a return type of int, unless int is somehow statically derivable from SomeArbitraryType (which is what I used the spec_info helper class for in my gist). –  Kevin Ballard Sep 17 '12 at 3:21

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Based on your edit, you just want a bog-standard template specialization

struct ReturnsInt{};
struct ReturnsVec{};

template<typename T>
class Foo {};

template<>
class Foo<ReturnsInt> {
public:
    int get() { return 3; }
};

template<>
class Foo<ReturnsVec> {
public:
    std::vector<int> get() {
        return {3};
    }
};

If you only want to modify one member function based on the template, but reuse the rest of the class definition, you can use a helper class

struct ReturnsInt{};
struct ReturnsVec{};

class helper_Foo {
public:
    string bar() {
        return "this is a shared method";
    }
};

template<typename T>
class Foo : public helper_Foo {};

template<>
class Foo<ReturnsInt> : public helper_Foo {
public:
    int get() { return 3; }
};

template<>
class Foo<ReturnsVec> : public helper_Foo {
public:
    std::vector<int> get() {
        return {3};
    }
};
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This works beautifully, but this technique seems troublesome when I have more than the single get method in Foo. I can't share the methods across specializations of the class. –  Bret Kuhns Sep 17 '12 at 3:21
1  
@BretKuhns: Put your actual class implementation in a helper class, and derive your templated class from that helper class. Then you can just define the get() member function in the templated class and let everything else come from the parent helper class. –  Kevin Ballard Sep 17 '12 at 3:23
    
Clever! That works perfectly. Thanks for your help! –  Bret Kuhns Sep 17 '12 at 3:28

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