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I have a Python list and I want to know what's the quickest way to count the number of occurrences of the item, '1' in this list. In my actual case, the item can occur tens of thousands of times which is why I want a fast way.

['1', '1', '1', '1', '1', '1', '2', '2', '2', '2', '7', '7', '7', '10', '10']

Does the collections module help? I'm using Python 2.7

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4  
Is the list always sorted? Are you always counting the first item? –  Josh Caswell Sep 17 '12 at 3:03
    
possible duplicate of How to calculate the occurrences of a list item in Python? –  Josh Caswell Sep 17 '12 at 3:05
    
@JoshCaswell No the list is not sorted and I'd count any item. I wasn't sure which approach: count or collections.Counter was better optimized which is why I asked –  prrao Sep 17 '12 at 3:08
1  
@prrao Depends if you want to do this multiple times or not. –  jamylak Sep 17 '12 at 3:10
    
@jamylak Yes I want to do this multiple times, for multiple items. –  prrao Sep 17 '12 at 3:11

1 Answer 1

up vote 15 down vote accepted
a = ['1', '1', '1', '1', '1', '1', '2', '2', '2', '2', '7', '7', '7', '10', '10']
print a.count("1")

It's probably optimized heavily at the C level.

Edit: I randomly generated a large list.

In [8]: len(a)
Out[8]: 6339347

In [9]: %timeit a.count("1")
10 loops, best of 3: 86.4 ms per loop

Edit edit: This could be done with collections.Counter

a = Counter(your_list)
print a['1']

Using the same list in my last timing example

In [17]: %timeit Counter(a)['1']
1 loops, best of 3: 1.52 s per loop

My timing is simplistic and conditional on many different factors, but it gives you a good clue as to performance.

Here is some profiling

In [24]: profile.run("a.count('1')")
         3 function calls in 0.091 seconds

   Ordered by: standard name

   ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.091    0.091 <string>:1(<module>)
        1    0.091    0.091    0.091    0.091 {method 'count' of 'list' objects}

        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'disable' of '_lsprof.Prof
iler' objects}



In [25]: profile.run("b = Counter(a); b['1']")
         6339356 function calls in 2.143 seconds

   Ordered by: standard name

   ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
        1    0.000    0.000    2.143    2.143 <string>:1(<module>)
        2    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 _weakrefset.py:68(__contains__)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 abc.py:128(__instancecheck__)
        1    0.000    0.000    2.143    2.143 collections.py:407(__init__)
        1    1.788    1.788    2.143    2.143 collections.py:470(update)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {getattr}
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {isinstance}
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'disable' of '_lsprof.Prof
iler' objects}
  6339347    0.356    0.000    0.356    0.000 {method 'get' of 'dict' objects}
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Which approach do you think is better optimized? I guess the better option is case dependent? –  prrao Sep 17 '12 at 3:09
    
@prrao Use .count –  Jakob Bowyer Sep 17 '12 at 3:10
5  
@prrao. In this case count is ~20x faster than creating a Counter, but the same Counter can be used to retrieve counts of multiple different value at very low extra cost. If you need to count 20 or more values from the same list Counter will be more efficient than running .count() 20 times –  gnibbler Sep 17 '12 at 5:16

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