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Question:

Define a DFA that accepts all strings over {0,1} such that every block of five consecutive positions contains at least two 0s. Please read the question carefully. Ask yourselves: Does this allow e (epsilon (empty string)) to be accepted? How about 0101? Such English descriptions are found in various books, and I want to make sure you know how to read and interpret.

Instructor Hint: "The "blocks of 5" DFA can be programmatically generated without much trouble. I did it both ways (by hand and programmatically). Because I'm good with Emacs and Keyboard Macros, I could do even the 'by hand' mechanically and quite fast. But programmatic is less error-prone and compact."


I'm drawing this thing out, and I think I'm doing it wrong, as it is getting out of control.

My sketch of the DFA before I make it in python: enter image description here

However, this isn't right, because index 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 constitute a block of five consecutive positions, so I need to account for at least two zeroes in that. Oh, great, and I have been thinking it needs two 1s, not two 0s. Am I going about this the entirely wrong way? Because the way I'm thinking, this is going to have a huge amount of states.

(goes back to drawing this large DFA)

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1  
It has it, or it did, huh. Conflicting edit. –  user114518 Sep 17 '12 at 3:53
1  
Look at the revision history - Tim cited meta.stackexchange.com/questions/147100/… –  irrelephant Sep 17 '12 at 3:55
1  
The way I would go about this would be to define a state for each possible 5-bit string, representing the last 5 bits seen. Start off at the state representing 00000, move from state to state naturally, and mark each state with more than 2 zeroes as accepting. –  Bwmat Sep 17 '12 at 3:57
    
Right, so that's one of my biggest mental blocks. Should an empty string be treated as 00000? EDIT: Because I could make my diagram SO much nicer if I just started with 00000, and push positions out of the left by adding things on the right. –  user114518 Sep 17 '12 at 3:59
    
well, your decision on that seems to be part of the assignment –  Bwmat Sep 17 '12 at 4:00

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you want to do it the old school way:

def check(s):
    buffer = s[:5]
    i = 5
    count0, count1 = 0, 0
    while i < len(s):
        if len(buffer) == 5:
            first = buffer[0]
            if first == '0':
                count0 -= 1
            else:
                count1 -= 1
            buffer = buffer[1:]
        buffer += s[i]
        if buffer[-1] == '0':
            count0 += 1
        else:
            count1 += 1
        if count0 < 2:
            return "REJECT"
        i += 1
    if buffer.count('0') >= 2:
        return "ACCEPT"
    else:
        return "REJECT"

A slightly smarter way:

def check(s):
    return all(ss.count('0')>=2 for ss in (s[i:i+5] for i in xrange(len(s)-4)))

The verbose code of the above method:

def check(s):
    subs = (s[i:i+5] for i in xrange(len(s)-4))
    for sub in subs:
        if sub.count('0') < 2:
            return "REJECT"
    return "ACCEPT"

Haven't tested this code, but it should likely work. Your professor probably wants the third method.

Hope this helps

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Just got to finish drawing it out first, thanks much sir! –  user114518 Sep 17 '12 at 4:39

The way I would go about this would be to define a state for each possible 5-bit string, representing the last 5 bits seen. Start off at the state representing 00000, move from state to state naturally, and mark each state with 2 or more zeroes as accepting.

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There are actually 11 16 states, including the single rejecting state. The states correspond to the up-to-four-character histories, truncated at the second most-recent zero. Only four characters are needed because the transition constitutes the fifth character in the block; if the transition character is not a 0 and there are not two zeros in the four-character history, then the transition is to failure.

I generated the transitions by hand, because it was faster to type than to write Python, so I'll leave the generalized (k, n) (k zeros in blocks of n) problem as a coding exercise. (I inserted x's into the state names to make it line up better.)

sxx00 (0)->sxx00 (1)->sx001
sx001 (0)->sx010 (1)->s0011
sx010 (0)->sxx00 (1)->s0101
s0011 (0)->s0110 (1)->s0111
s0101 (0)->sx010 (1)->s1011
s0110 (0)->sxx00 (1)->s1101
s0111 (0)->s1110 (1)->sFAIL
s1011 (0)->s0110 (1)->sFAIL
s1101 (0)->sx010 (1)->sFAIL
s1110 (0)->sxx00 (1)->sFAIL
sFAIL (0)->sFAIL (1)->sFAIL

[EDIT]: That was actually not quite correct, because (as I read the question), the string '1111' should be accepted. (Every five-character block in it has two zeros, trivially, since there are no five-character blocks.) So there are some additional start-up states:

start (0)->sxx00 (1)->s1
s1    (0)->sx010 (1)->s11
s11   (0)->s0110 (1)->s111
s111  (0)->s1110 (1)->s1111
s1111 (0)->sFAIL (1)->sFAIL

That last state, which looks a lot like sFAIL, is different because it is an accepting state.

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Ah yes, I forgot that you could just go to the 'sink' once you got a block with too few zeroes, that does allow you to use less than 32 states since there's fewer possible 'prior' states for any accepting state. –  Bwmat Sep 17 '12 at 22:44

The way I would go about this would be to define a state for each possible 5-bit string, representing the last 5 bits seen. Start off at the state representing 00000, move from state to state naturally, and mark each state with more than 2 zeroes as accepting.

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That's 32 different states. There has to be a better way –  inspectorG4dget Sep 17 '12 at 4:21
    
Do tell if you figure something out, I'm stoked I'm down to 32 rather than my original 64! –  user114518 Sep 17 '12 at 4:27
    
I'm almost certain 32 states are required for this. You need to remember the last 5 bits seen and their order ( since you need to know whether the old value you're throwing away was a 0 or 1 when moving to the next state ). That's 5-bits of state, and therefore you need 32 states to capture that. –  Bwmat Sep 17 '12 at 4:48

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