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I am trying to solve this exercise, It seems easy this, but I can not understand the contraints -rules, It says:

  1. the number may be represented on one or two hands;
  2. if the number is represented on two hands, the larger number is given first

    The rule number 2 I can not understand for example if it says 3, I have 3, 2+1, 1+2 (this not because its repeated), if it says 6 we have 6, 5+1, 4+2, 3+3, 2+4 + 1+5 but the correct output is 3, can someone guide me in this problem?? for 7 is 2, and 8 is 2, 9 is 1, and 10 is 1.

this is my code:

import java.util.Scanner;

class j1 {

    public static void main(String args[]) {
        Scanner sc = new Scanner(System.in);
        int tot = 5;
        int n = sc.nextInt();
        int sum = 0;
        int count = 1;

        for (int i = 1; i <= tot; i++) {

            for (int j = 1; j <= tot; j++) {
                sum = i + j;
                if (sum == n) {

                    System.out.println(i);
                    System.out.println(j);
                    count++;
                }
              }


        }

        System.out.println(count);
        sc.close();
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
what is yo question? –  Tae-Sung Shin Sep 17 '12 at 4:06
6  
The larger number is given first. That means that 1+2 is invalid, as are also 2+4 and 1+5. Also, 6 is invalid because we are presumably talking non-mutated, normal human hands (range 0..5)! Therefore there are 3 ways to express "6": 5+1, 4+2, 3+3 –  lc. Sep 17 '12 at 4:07
    
The statement of the problem sounds ambiguous. For the example 6, any of the answers 5+1, 4+2, and 3+3 satisfies requirement 2, so unless there's another requirement specifying that the subcomponents must be as close to equal as possible, it's not clear why only 3+3 is correct. –  Jim Garrison Sep 17 '12 at 4:07
    
@JimGarrison The problem asks for the number of correct solutions. The correct output is 3 because 5+1, 4+2, and 3+3 are the 3 solutions. –  irrelephant Sep 17 '12 at 4:12
2  
@koyuki of course, 5+2 and 4+3. –  0605002 Sep 17 '12 at 4:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Its simple - if you are going to give the number using both the hands (2 hands) then you will first need to give the larger number which comprises the overall number -

eg for 7 (4+3 OR 5+2) when represented using 2 hands - give 4 first !

other option for 7 (3+4, 2+5) are invalid since it will make us to list the smaller number first which violates the rule #2

share|improve this answer
    
Why wouldn't 5+2 be counted first? 5 > 4. –  Makoto Sep 17 '12 at 4:14
    
and if I have 8? –  koyuki Sep 17 '12 at 4:14
    
Ok understood it thanks –  koyuki Sep 17 '12 at 4:28

The number of the second hand must always be less than or equal to the number of the first hand. I believe the code below will work.

import java.util.Scanner;

class j1 {

    public static void main(String args[]) {
        Scanner sc = new Scanner(System.in);
        int tot = 5;
        int n = sc.nextInt();
        int sum = 0;
        int count = 1;

        for (int i = 1; i <= tot; i++) {

            for (int j = 1; j <= i; j++) {
                sum = i + j;
                if (sum == n) {

                    System.out.println(i);
                    System.out.println(j);
                    count++;
                }
              }


        }

        System.out.println(count);
        sc.close();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
you copy -paste my code –  koyuki Sep 17 '12 at 4:15
    
Yeah I'm not seeing any difference with the code sample either. –  Makoto Sep 17 '12 at 4:18
    
There's one difference: the condition of the inner loop - j <= i where the question has j <= tot. –  0605002 Sep 17 '12 at 4:24
    
Fair enough; go ahead and edit your answer a bit (clean it up with using some unique variable names) so I could change my vote. –  Makoto Sep 17 '12 at 4:33

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