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This is the problem:

Using only two operations in C ( & and <=), and up to a maximum of 5 operations, determine whether a character is alphabetical lowercase or uppercase. You may declare as many variables as you want, but you're limited to 5 operations of bitwise and (&) and the <= comparison.

example:

is_char('b') = 1
is_char('A') = 1
is_char(10) = 0

I can do it in 6 operations, but can't do it in 5.... Anyone have an idea?

Sorry!! Forgot to include that no one can use control flow statements :/

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closed as not a real question by pst, pickypg, j0k, Abhinav Sarkar, ЯegDwight Sep 17 '12 at 8:49

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7  
Show us what you tried. –  Barmar Sep 17 '12 at 4:38
1  
I'm willing to bet it's something like if (('A' <= c) & (c <= 'Z')) return true; else if (('a' <= c) & (c <= 'z')) return true; else return false;. –  chris Sep 17 '12 at 4:58
2  
Don't you just love homework assignments that teach bad habits. –  paddy Sep 17 '12 at 5:00
1  
@paddy, Because nothing anymore could possibly use EBCDIC ;) –  chris Sep 17 '12 at 5:03
1  
@oldrinb, I do believe you are correct. I reference EBCDIC because it's one where for (char c = 'A'; c <= 'Z'; ++c) printf("%c", c); won't do exactly what you'd expect. –  chris Sep 17 '12 at 5:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here's how to do it with five operations and no control-flow statements. We avoid a second range test by dropping the 0x20 bit (mapping the a-z range onto the A-Z range):

int is_char(unsigned char c) {
    return ((c & ~0x20) <= 'Z') & ('A' <= (c & ~0x20))
}

Note that you can code ~0x20 as 0xdf if you don't want ~ accidentally considered an operator.

Declaring another variable cuts this down to four ops:

int is_char(unsigned char c) {
    unsigned char cap = c & 0xdf;
    return ('A' <= cap) & (cap <= 'Z');
}
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1  
Very nice! Masking the case off and then testing was holding me back from reducing the number of ops. –  James Sep 17 '12 at 6:20

Gabe you are forgetting that in C a char is represented as an int in the ASCII table. So this can be done in two operations. (I am thinking the OP didn't fully elaborate on the question however)

if (c <= 'A' - 1)
    return 0;
if ('z' + 1 <= c)
    return 0;
return 1;
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4  
What about the following characters between 'Z' and 'z': 5b [ 5c \ 5d ] 5e ^ 5f _ 60 –  James Sep 17 '12 at 4:53
1  
new user tip: feel free to elaborate with your answers, especially when person who asked it you consider a newbie with subject, he/she will probably appreciate more explanation about ascii table, and how it works, with some link maybe.. –  Piotr Wadas Sep 18 '12 at 0:24

Do you have to use & operator? If not, you can do it with 4 <= operations:

if (c <= 'A' - 1)
    return 0;
if (c <= 'Z')
    return 1;
if (c <= 'a' - 1)
    return 0;
if (c <= 'z')
    return 1;
return 0;

Note: this assumes ASCII, and the use of 'A' - 1 is just for illustration -- converting it to a constant is left as an exercise to the reader.

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you can't use control flow statements like if :/ forgot to add that sorry –  n00b Sep 17 '12 at 5:17

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