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DISCLAIMER: neither Boost, nor C++11 allowed.

I've a program, in which I create an instance of Foo and I operate with it in a number of threads. Then I want to delete it securely so those threads do not fall into a segmentation fault.

I've added a mutex member to Foo and lock it each time a thread function runs. In order different threads do not conflict with each other.

class Foo
{
    public:
        pthread_mutex_t mutex;
};

void* thread ( void* fooPtr )
{
    Foo* fooPointer = (Foo*) fooPtr;

    while ( 1 )
    {
        if ( fooPointer )
        {
            pthread_mutex_lock ( &fooPointer->mutex );
            /* some code, involving fooPointer */
            pthread_mutex_unlock ( &fooPointer->mutex );
        }
        else
        {
            pthread_exit ( NULL );
        }
    }
}

Now I want to delete foo securely so no errors occur in threads. I've added a destructor to Foo:

Foo::~Foo()
{
    pthread_mutex_lock ( &mutex );
}

Now the object will not be deleted until all threads finish current loop.

The question is: will the mutex be unlocked after an instance is deleted? Will all the threads finish after an instance is deleted? I bet the answer is no. So I change the destructor, but now it seems thread-unsafe:

Foo::~Foo()
{
    pthread_mutex_lock ( &mutex );
    pthread_mutex_unlock ( &mutex );
}

Can the thread function lock the mutex and start operating the instance after pthread_mutex_unlock ( &mutex ); and BEFORE the object is deleted?

share|improve this question
1  
YOu are passing the Foo to your thread functions, therefore, why not simply delete the object after all threads have finished running? If not you should write your own version of shared_ptr as mentioned above –  mathematician1975 Sep 17 '12 at 8:13
5  
Or just... copy the damn header. The boost license allows you to do that (slightly less essential: is RAII also not allowed? Use it for the lock guards) –  sehe Sep 17 '12 at 8:14
1  
Your if(fooPointer) will never work. No one will come and set your fooPointer to NULL just because the foo object is deleted. You can use a weak pointer for that purpose, if somehow your application really requires such a communication between the threads. –  enobayram Sep 17 '12 at 8:18
4  
Because you've built a solution around a misunderstanding, and just given what you've done, it's impossible to deduce what you should be doing. –  enobayram Sep 17 '12 at 8:33
4  
The solution is to implement the boost::shared_ptr and boost::weak_ptr yourself then! Your fooPointer needs to be a weak pointer, end of story. –  enobayram Sep 17 '12 at 8:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What is missing here is the condition that dictates when thread processing is completed. Deletion of a particular object instance is not a good condition. You havent shown us where the object is deleted. If we could see this in the code, the extra context would be helpful.

What I would suggest is instead of deleting the object, set a flag on the object (bool active() for example). This flag will then be checked by all threads, and when it indicates stop processing, then the threads will stop. Set this flag where you are currently deleting the Foo object. Then once all threads have stopped, delete the Foo object.

If you delete the object and expect to be able to acquire its mutex lock, you will possibly get a crash, or at the least unstable behavior, since the mutex is a member of Foo, and it will be destroyed with the object.

Here's an example of what I mean:

class Foo
{
    public:
        void lockMutex();
        void unlockMutex();
        // Active should be mutex protected as well
        // Or you could consider using a pthread_rwlock
        bool active() {return active_;}
        void setActive(bool a) {active_ = a;}
    private:
        pthread_mutex_t mutex;
        bool active_;
};

void* thread ( void* fooPtr )
{
    Foo* fooPointer = (Foo*) fooPtr;

    while ( 1 )
    {
        if ( fooPointer->active() )
        {
            fooPointer->lockMutex();
            /* some code, involving fooPointer */
            fooPointer->unlockMutex();
        }
        else
        {
            pthread_exit ( NULL );
        }
    }

    // somewhere else in the code
    fooPointer->setActive(false);
}

Foo::setActive(true) must be called either in the constructor, or when the object is created. And the Foo object should be deleted once the threads stop, most likely after pthread_join() has completed.

share|improve this answer
1  
Access to active needs some way to guarantee visibility of updates. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Sep 17 '12 at 8:56
    
@R.MartinhoFernandes, good point, it should be mutex protected too. –  Brady Sep 17 '12 at 8:57

Let's start with the begin of your question:

I've a program, in which I create an instance of Foo and I operate with it in a number of threads. Then I want to delete it securely so those threads do not fall into a segmentation fault.

You cannot delete an object which is in use. No amount of mutexes will fix that.

I've added a destructor to Foo

This is only run when Foo is being deleted. Its contents don't matter much, though: It's wrong to call the dtor while other threads are still using Foo.

I want a thread securely exit when an instance is deleted. How is it possible?

Well, that's the correct question. I could write a whole lot of code for you to use, but that code would just be a copy of boost::weak_ptr. So, I won't bother. Just take the boost code yourself.

Boost not allowed.

Then why are you asking on StackOverflow? That's essentially the same license.

share|improve this answer
1  
:)) I <3 this answer. –  Luchian Grigore Sep 17 '12 at 9:07
1  
Boost is allowed for ideas, not for code, the problem is I can't get the idea from the boost code. It's just unreadable... template<class T> class weak_ptr { private: // Borland 5.5.1 specific workarounds typedef weak_ptr<T> this_type; public: typedef T element_type; weak_ptr(): px(0), pn() // never throws in 1.30+ { } // generated copy constructor, assignment, destructor are fine... #if defined( BOOST_HAS_RVALUE_REFS ) // ... except in C++0x, move disables the implicit copy weak_ptr( weak_ptr const & r ): px( r.px ), pn( r.pn ) // never throw . –  Kolyunya Sep 17 '12 at 9:10
1  
TRWTF is "is allowed for ideas, not for code". Can you spell "NIH syndrome" –  sehe Sep 17 '12 at 9:25
1  
The F stands for Failure (it's The Real Worse Than Failure). You don't need to understand the boost code, you can just copy it. You can use the bcp tool to extract the parts you want. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Sep 17 '12 at 9:45
3  
@Kolyunya: Do you understand the small string optimization in your vendors std::string implementation? The empty base class trick employed for optimizing memory requirements on some of the std lib's types? No? Thought so. Now, what again was your objection? –  sbi Sep 17 '12 at 14:33

your code posted is not right because c++ object is destroyed by steps blow:

obj->Foo::~Foo();

free memory //maybe delete if allocated by new

so your source is only protoecting the destructor but not the memory free itself.

maybe source code follows could help you, it's simple and crude but I think it can works

    class Foo 
    {

       public:
         void dosomething() {}
    };

    template<typename T>
    class Protect
    {   
    public: 
        struct auto_lock {
            auto_lock(pthread_mutex_t& mutex)
                : _mutex(mutex)
            {
                pthread_mutex_lock ( &_mutex );
            }
            ~ auto_lock() 
            {
                pthread_mutex_unlock ( &_mutex );
            }
            pthread_mutex_t& _mutex;
        };

        Protect(T*& p): _p(p) {}
        T* get() { return _p; }

        void lock() { pthread_mutex_lock ( &_mutex ); }
        void unlock() { pthread_mutex_unlock ( &_mutex );}
        pthread_mutex_t& getlock() { return _mutex; }

        void safe_release() { 
            auto_lock l(_mutex);
            if (_p != NULL)  {
                delete _p;
                _p = NULL;
            }
        }
    private:
        T*& _p;
        pthread_mutex_t _mutex;
    };

void* thread ( void* proPtr )
{
    Protect<Foo>* proPointer = (Protect<Foo>*) proPtr;

    while ( 1 )
    {
        Protect<Foo>::auto_lock l(proPointer->getlock());
        Foo* fooPtr = proPointer->get();
        if ( fooPtr )
        {
            fooPtr->dosomething();
        }
        else
        {
            pthread_exit ( NULL );
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
(Not my downvote). your assumption is wrong. When it's OK to run the dtor, it is so because there are no other users of the object, and therefore of the memory. That means there is no need to "protect" the memory free itself. –  MSalters Sep 17 '12 at 12:19
    
My answer is wrong, I think I didn't understand the whole thing completely. Thanks, MSalters. –  stepinto Sep 18 '12 at 0:28

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