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I tried to understand this plugin system but got a little confused.

var obj={};
obj.plugin={
create: function(pluginname){
    var default_value='p1';
    var f1 = function(){
            alert(default_value);
            //define plugin properties
        }
    obj[pluginname] = function(){return new f1();}
    /*
    run other code here
    */
    return {
        //
        f2: function(args){
            default_value=args;
        }                    
    }
}
};
obj.plugin.create('pluginA').f2('pa');
obj.plugin.create('pluginB').f2('pb');
obj.pluginA();  // pa
obj.pluginB();  // pb

I think the result should be like this:

obj.pluginA();  // pb
obj.pluginB();  // pb

And another question is : 'new f1()' will not be run until the last two line. where the 'default_value' has been stored?

share|improve this question
    
Object is like a folder where it can contains subfolders and files. i.e.: simple variable types and/or subobjects. –  Jay Sep 17 '12 at 9:09

1 Answer 1

A little source code explanation first:

var obj={};
obj.plugin={
// object plugin property is an object that has create property defined here
// create property is a function that adds another properties to object in general
create: function(pluginname){
    // this default value has got 'var' modifier - it is local and has scope of 'create'
    var default_value='p1';
    // f1 is a plugin's function - it does what a plugin creator implements
    var f1 = function(){
            // it encloses 'default_value' locally in 'create'
            alert(default_value);
            //define plugin properties
        }
    // the line below is the creation of a new property, which allows the object
    // to call a method of name of a plugin; it assigns to the property of that name
    // the f1 function closure, but local to actual execution of 'create';
    // note the use of 'new' operator which copies the function making it independent
    // from other calls of 'create'
    obj[pluginname] = function(){return new f1();}
    /*
    run other code here
    */
    return {
        // this function allows you to change 'default_value' still in scope
        // of the same call of 'create', thus effectively changing that one (locally - it's 'var');
        f2: function(args){
            default_value=args;
        }                    
    }
// after leaving this brace you leave the 'create' scope
}
// and the plugin object scope
};

Now how it'll work:

This: obj.plugin.create('pluginA').f2('pa');
asks plugin property for create, which is a function, which is called with 'pluginA' string. To call that function js creates the context of the call (which in fact is some structured object on top of the stack). 'pluginA' is put on the stack as an argument, default_value, f1 and f2 are put on the stack as a local variables. Then create function is executed. Initialization of variables goes first, then this assignment obj[pluginname] = function(){return new f1();}

This creates pluginA property in object. Notice, that then the local function f1 is passed outside the scope, to the global object as a property. Then there is a return statement which pops all local variables, and all actual parameters from the stack and puts in returning value which escapes the call scope. Then the scope is left.

Here a little trick takes place. The returned value is an object that has got a function having a reference to 'default_value' from the scope that has been left. It is possible, because, in fact, actual objects are stored on the heap, while on the stack there are only references to those. It means that default_value still exists on the heap and is referenced by f2 function in that returned object.

When f2 is called the control enters f2 call scope. Since it's been defined in create it has reference to the default value object on the heap. Since it can access that object, it can also change it - to 'pa'. Then f2's call scope is left, and after the semicolon the returned value is also left. The f1 function also has the reference to that default_value, now equal to 'pa'. That f1 function is 'closed' in 'pluginA' property of an object.

It means, that a global object now has got a property pluginA, that is a function (that were named f1). That function has a reference to an object (that were named default_value). And that object is a string 'pa'. The values are kept accessible via indirect reference in always accessible object.

This: obj.plugin.create('pluginB').f2('pb');
does the same thing respectively with other parameters, hence creates pluginB property in object. It is another call of create, so it has got a totally new default_value. That is another local instance. The very same magic closes that new object in global object in another property (pluginB). Create returns a new object that encloses a new function f2. That one is has access to that 'newer' default_value, but has nothing to do with the one from the previous call. When f2 is called on another returned object it changes that "new" default_value to 'pb'.

After that, the below is self-explanatory...

obj.pluginA();  // pa
obj.pluginB();  // pb
share|improve this answer
    
I got you but i can't understand how js worked in memory. T_T –  HACK21 Sep 18 '12 at 12:15
    
To understand the whole, you need to first understand the part. What is that concerns you most? Point that out, so I could know where do you need detailed explanation. –  Krzysztof Jabłoński Sep 18 '12 at 15:13
    
You say "After the semicolon, create's call scope is left",but i can't see "create's call scope" through firebug or Chrome tool.I just want to know how it exist. –  HACK21 Sep 19 '12 at 1:43

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