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suppose I have following sql statement in sql server 2008:

BEGIN TRANSACTION    
SqlStatement1    
EXEC sp1    
SqlStatement3
COMMIT TRANSACTION

The code of sp1

BEGIN TRANSACTION
SqlStatement2
ROLLBACK TRANSACTION

My question is: Is SqlStatement3 actually executed?

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up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can use transaction savepoints. sp1 can use a pattern like the one described in Error Handling and Nested Transactions:

create procedure [usp_my_procedure_name]
as
begin
    set nocount on;
    declare @trancount int;
    set @trancount = @@trancount;
    begin try
        if @trancount = 0
            begin transaction
        else
            save transaction usp_my_procedure_name;

        -- Do the actual work here

lbexit:
        if @trancount = 0   
            commit;
    end try
    begin catch
        declare @error int, @message varchar(4000), @xstate int;
        select @error = ERROR_NUMBER(), @message = ERROR_MESSAGE(), @xstate = XACT_STATE();
        if @xstate = -1
            rollback;
        if @xstate = 1 and @trancount = 0
            rollback
        if @xstate = 1 and @trancount > 0
            rollback transaction usp_my_procedure_name;

        raiserror ('usp_my_procedure_name: %d: %s', 16, 1, @error, @message) ;
    end catch   
end

Such a pattern allow for the work done in sp1 to rollback, but keep the encompassing transaction active.

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SQL Server doesn't really support nested transactions. There is only one transaction at a time.

This one transaction has a basic nested transaction counter, @@TRANCOUNT. Each consecutive begin transaction increments the counter by one, each commit transaction reduces it by one. Only the commit that reduces the counter to 0 really commits the one transaction.

A rollback transaction undoes the one transaction and clears @@TRANCOUNT.

In your case, the funny result is that SqlStatement3 is run outside a transaction! Your final commit will throw an "The COMMIT TRANSACTION request has no corresponding BEGIN TRANSACTION" exception, but the effects of SqlStatement3 are permanent.

For example:

create table #t (col1 int)
insert #t (col1) values (1)
BEGIN TRANSACTION
update #t set col1 = 2 -- This gets rolled back
BEGIN TRANSACTION
update #t set col1 = 3 -- This gets rolled back too
ROLLBACK TRANSACTION
update #t set col1 = 4 -- This is run OUTSIDE a transaction!
COMMIT TRANSACTION -- Throws error
select col1 from #t

Prints 4. Really. :)

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This answer has the right idea, but the example doesn't prove anything because table variables aren't affected by rollback. If you remove the last UPDATE statement, the row's final value will be 3, not 1. Changing the table variable to a temp table would make the example valid. – Endemic Feb 3 at 16:50
    
@Endemic: Thanks, you're right! I've updated the answer. – Andomar Feb 4 at 12:52

Rollback transaction on its own rolls back all transactions.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms181299(v=sql.100).aspx

The statement will still be executed - try this

create table #t (i int)
insert #t values (1)  -- t contains (1)

begin tran
    update #t set i = i +1
    select * from #t  -- t contains (2)
    begin tran
        update #t set i = i +1 
        select * from #t -- t contains (3)
    rollback tran  -- transaction is rolled back

select * from #t -- t contains (1)
update #t set i = i +1
select * from #t -- t contains (2)
commit    -- error occurs
select * from #t -- t contains (2)
drop table #t
share|improve this answer
    
So, the answer is 'no'? – Niyoko Yuliawan Sep 17 '12 at 9:38
    
No, the answer is yes. The statement gets executed, but the commit will throw an error. – podiluska Sep 17 '12 at 9:41
    
So, I can conclude that I can't put ROLLBACK TRANSACTION inside a stored procedure that may be called from other statement. – Niyoko Yuliawan Sep 17 '12 at 9:47
    
You should check @@trancount and name your transactions – podiluska Sep 17 '12 at 9:49
    
Ok. Thank you.. – Niyoko Yuliawan Sep 17 '12 at 9:51

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