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I'm making a singly linked list and I'm making an add to beginning node. Whenever I run my tester it works, but it adds (what I assume) an extra node at the beginning with the address.

tester:

#include <iostream>
#include "linkedlist.h"

using namespace std;

void test01() {

  LinkedList < int > A;

  cout << endl << endl; 
  cout << " ***************** " << endl;
  cout << " *  TEST SET #1  * " << endl;
  cout << " ***************** " << endl;


  cout << "Is the list empty? " << boolalpha << A.isEmpty() <<endl; 
  cout << A << endl;
  cout << "Size of A = " << A.size() << endl;

  //TEST : Inserting 10 numbers to a
  cout << endl << "TEST : Inserting 10 numbers to A" << endl;
  for (int k=0; k<10; k++)
  {
    A.insert_front(k+1);
  } 
  cout << A << endl;
  cout << "Size of a = " << A.size() << endl;

  //TEST : Clearing A
  cout << endl << "TEST : Clearing A" << endl;
  A.clear();
  cout << A << endl;
  cout << "Size of A = " << A.size() << endl << endl;


  cout << "Test 01 - Done!" << endl;
} // Destructor Called Here!!

int main () {

  cout << "Hello World!!, This is the LinkedList LARGE Tester" << endl; 

  test01();


  cout << "LARGE Done!" << endl;
  return 0;
}

LinkedList.hpp (what i'm allowed to modify)

#include "linkedlist.h"

 // --------
 // ---- Basic Accessor Operations ---
 // --------
 // Purpose: accessor function for the current # data values in the list
 // Returns: current size of the list
 template <class T>
 int LinkedList<T>::size() const
 {
 }

  // Purpose: puts the data x in the front of the list 
  // Parameters: x is data value to inserted
  // Postconditions: x is the first element of the list
 template <class T>
 void LinkedList<T>::insert_front(const T& x)
 {
  if(m_next == NULL)
  {
   m_next = new LinkedList<T>;
   m_next->m_data = x;
   m_next->m_next = NULL;
  }

  LinkedList<T> *temp;
  temp = new LinkedList<T>;
  temp->m_data = x;
  temp->m_next = m_next;
  m_next = temp;

 }

LinkedList.h (not allowed to modify)

template <class T>
class LinkedList
{
public:
  T m_data;                // Data to be stored
  LinkedList<T>* m_next;      // Pointer to the next element in the list
  static T m_objerr;

    // Purpose: Default constructor
    // Postconditions: next pointer set to NULL
    // -INLINE-
  LinkedList() : m_next(NULL) {}

    // Purpose: Auxiliaty constructor, construct from parameters
    //     useful when inserting elements
    // Postconditions: data and next pointer set to parameters
    // -INLINE-
  LinkedList(const T& x, LinkedList<T>* p) 
             : m_data(x), m_next(p) {}

   void insert_front(const T& x);

   int size() const;

}

After compiling the list cout is correct but theres an added node at the beginning that contains the address location for that node. I tried quite a few ways but none of them seem to remove that last node no matter what.

share|improve this question
    
Your class is incomplete, you should apply the Rule of Three. As far as I can see you have at least one memory leak. –  Tony The Lion Sep 17 '12 at 9:52
    
Is that 1:1 the real code? This shouldn’t even compile (actually, it should compile, but not link) – you cannot just dump template code into a separate compilation unit. –  Konrad Rudolph Sep 17 '12 at 9:56
    
I suggest you save time and frustration and go with the STL list. It's already been written and verified so you don't have to. –  Thomas Matthews Sep 17 '12 at 19:38

1 Answer 1

Let's see what happens when you add the very first node to the list:

template <class T>
 void LinkedList<T>::insert_front(const T& x)
 {
     if(m_next == NULL) // m_next is NULL
     {
        // ok, let's add the first node

        m_next = new LinkedList<T>;
        m_next->m_data = x;
        m_next->m_next = NULL; // this line isn't neccesary, the default constructor
                               // called in the new expression above took care of that
        // you should utilize the other constructor and say
        // m_next = new LinkedList<T>(x, m_next);

        // ok, done, let's continue with the code below
     }

     // Wait a second! We already added a node, what are we doing here?

     LinkedList<T> *temp;
     temp = new LinkedList<T>;
     temp->m_data = x;
     temp->m_next = m_next;
     m_next = temp;
 }

So every time you add the first node, you're actually adding two. The rest of insertions work fine since the if condition isn't true anymore. To fix it, you can either wrap the second part of code in else block or add a return statement inside the if block.

Note that, with the way you're currently handling things, the whole insert_front method can be shortened to

m_next = new LinkedList<T>(x, m_next);

I can see some issues with the design of this, though. The class itself acts as a container and a node at the same time. Usualy linked list implementations use a separate class for the nodes and the actual container class just holds a pointer to the first node (and probably members to cache the size and tail, etc...). Another problem is the default constructor and the way you insert the first node. Currently a default constructed list holds undefined m_data as the first node. The very first insertion of a node should probably just set m_data to desired value and set m_next to NULL.

share|improve this answer
    
when i wrap the second part in an else the first node gets removed for some reason. so when cout it desplays 5,4,3,2] instead of 5,4,3,2,1] –  T.J. Williams Sep 17 '12 at 10:09
    
@T.J.Williams checked, it works for me, maybe it's the way you're iterating/printing the list. –  jrok Sep 17 '12 at 10:29
    
so when this prints, you get 10,9,8,7,6,5,4,3,2,1? when i cout it prints some random address, 10,9,8,7,6,5,4,3,2 –  T.J. Williams Sep 17 '12 at 10:45
    
With the corrections I suggested, yes. –  jrok Sep 17 '12 at 10:46
    
as it is now, m_data will always be node 1. do you happen to know a way around this? or maybe to have the second part (outside of m_next ==NULL) skip the first time its called? –  T.J. Williams Sep 18 '12 at 6:38

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