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I'm trying to implement undo support using Core Data on the iPhone and I ran into a few problems.

I currently have a couple of managed objects set up but when I make changes to their properties, these changes don't get recorded by the undo manager. From my understanding, Core Data is supposed to have this automatically set up and I should be able to have basic undo and redo support for changes, creation and deletion of managed objects.

Is there special way of making changes to the objects so that they get recorded by the undo manager? Or should I be registering undo actions for each change?

Also, suppose the application slides into a detailed view for editing a specific object. I would like to be able to undo all changes made when say, the cancel button is hit. Would undo grouping be applicable here? What is the difference between committing a group and have another undo manager manage the finer actions in the detailed view versus using just having one undo manager (the one included with the managed object context)?

Thanks!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 24 down vote accepted

While the undo features will work pretty much out of the box, you do need to allocate an NSUndoManager for the NSManagedObjectContext for which you want undo support.

The easiest way to do this is to set up the undo support when something asks your appDelegate for the NSManagedObjectContext

This is the default method that apple gives you:

- (NSManagedObjectContext *) managedObjectContext {

    if (managedObjectContext != nil) {
        return managedObjectContext;
    }

    NSPersistentStoreCoordinator *coordinator = [self persistentStoreCoordinator];
    if (coordinator != nil) {
        managedObjectContext = [[NSManagedObjectContext alloc] init];

        [managedObjectContext setPersistentStoreCoordinator: coordinator];
    }
    return managedObjectContext;
}

Modify it to look like this:

- (NSManagedObjectContext *) managedObjectContext {

    if (managedObjectContext != nil) {
        return managedObjectContext;
    }

    NSPersistentStoreCoordinator *coordinator = [self persistentStoreCoordinator];
    if (coordinator != nil) {
        managedObjectContext = [[NSManagedObjectContext alloc] init];

    	//Undo Support
    	NSUndoManager *anUndoManager = [[NSUndoManager	alloc] init];
    	[managedObjectContext setUndoManager:anUndoManager];
    	[anUndoManager release];

        [managedObjectContext setPersistentStoreCoordinator: coordinator];
    }
    return managedObjectContext;
}
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Thanks Ben +1, lovely succinct answer –  Aran Mulholland Oct 3 '10 at 0:03
    
I don't have creation or setting of an undo manager in my code, yet Undo works perfectly. Managed object contexts already have an undo manager. All one needs to do is have their window delegate implement something like this: - (NSUndoManager *)windowWillReturnUndoManager:(NSWindow *)window { return [[DB managedObjectContext] undoManager]; }. –  Ivan Vučica Sep 27 '11 at 15:16
2  
@IvanVučica this true when working with the OSX frameworks, however when you are working with the iOS frameworks there is no such thing as an NSWindow, and for light-weighting reasons, managed objects do not come with an undo manager. –  Intentss Sep 27 '11 at 20:19
    
@Ben Oops, I missed the fact that the question was about iPhone. Sorry about that! –  Ivan Vučica Sep 28 '11 at 11:09

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