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We've encountered a situation where MassTransit is losing messages if you create a publisher and consumer using the same endpoint name.

Note the code below; if I use a different endpoint name for either the consumer or publisher (e.g. "rabbitmq://localhost/mtlossPublised" for the publisher) then the message counts both published and consumed match; if I use the same endpoint name (as in the sample) then I get less messages consumed than published.

Is this expected behaviour? or am I doing something wrong, working sample code below.

using MassTransit;
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace MTMessageLoss
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var consumerBus = ServiceBusFactory.New(b =>
            {
                b.UseRabbitMq();
                b.UseRabbitMqRouting();
                b.ReceiveFrom("rabbitmq://localhost/mtloss");
            });
            var publisherBus = ServiceBusFactory.New(b =>
            {
                b.UseRabbitMq();
                b.UseRabbitMqRouting();
                b.ReceiveFrom("rabbitmq://localhost/mtloss");
            });
            consumerBus.SubscribeConsumer(() => new MessageConsumer());
            for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
                publisherBus.Publish(new SimpleMessage() { CorrelationId = Guid.NewGuid(), Message = string.Format("This is message {0}", i) });
            Console.WriteLine("Press ENTER Key to see how many you consumed");
            Console.ReadLine();
            Console.WriteLine("We consumed {0} simple messages. Press Enter to terminate the applicaion.", MessageConsumer.Count);
            Console.ReadLine();
            consumerBus.Dispose();
            publisherBus.Dispose();
        }
    }
    public interface ISimpleMessage : CorrelatedBy<Guid>
    {
        string Message { get; }
    }
    public class SimpleMessage : ISimpleMessage
    {
        public Guid CorrelationId { get; set; }
        public string Message { get; set; }
    }
    public class MessageConsumer : Consumes<ISimpleMessage>.All
    {
        public static int Count = 0;
        public void Consume(ISimpleMessage message)
        {
            System.Threading.Interlocked.Increment(ref Count);
        }
    }
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Bottom line, every instance of a bus needs it's own queue to read from. Even if the bus only exists to publish messages. This is just a requirement of how MassTransit works.

http://masstransit.readthedocs.org/en/master/configuration/config_api.html#basic-options - see the warning.

We leave the behaviour as undefined when two bus instances share the same queue. Regardless, it's not a condition we support. Each bus instance may send meta data to other bus instances, and requires it's own endpoint. This was a much bigger deal with MSMQ, so maybe we could get this case to work on RabbitMQ - but it's not something we've spent much thought into at this point.

share|improve this answer
    
Travis, Binary Worrier. Thanks to you both for your inputs. Thanks for that link to the documentation Travis; I had not seen that before; and I had thought I had read all of the documentation on the site. All of it obviously did not sink in :) –  Bigtoe Sep 18 '12 at 8:14
    
@Bigtoe There's a lot to absorb, if you have any thoughts on how to make anything you missed the first time through more explicit, we'd be happy to hear your comments. Whatever can allow people easier access to MT is great. –  Travis Sep 18 '12 at 17:07

What's happening is that in giving the same Receiver Uri you're telling MT to load balance consumption on the two busses, however you've only one bus listening to the messages.

If you get it to keep track of which messages are received you'll see it's (nearly) every second one.

Having tweaked your sample code I get

We consumed 6 simple messages. Press Enter to terminate the applicaion.
Received 0
Received 3
Received 5
Received 6
Received 7
Received 8

Start a consumer on the other bus and you'll get them all

We consumed 10 simple messages. Press Enter to terminate the applicaion.
Received 0
Received 1
Received 2
Received 3
Received 4
Received 5
Received 6
Received 7
Received 8
Received 9

So yes, I'd say this is expected behaviour.

Here's the tweaked sample code with two subscribers

using MassTransit;
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace MTMessageLoss
{
    class Program
    {
        internal static bool[] msgReceived = new bool[10];
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var consumerBus = ServiceBusFactory.New(b =>
                {
                    b.UseRabbitMq();
                    b.UseRabbitMqRouting();
                    b.ReceiveFrom("rabbitmq://localhost/mtloss");
                });
            var publisherBus = ServiceBusFactory.New(b =>
                {
                    b.UseRabbitMq();
                    b.UseRabbitMqRouting();
                    b.ReceiveFrom("rabbitmq://localhost/mtloss");
                });
            publisherBus.SubscribeConsumer(() => new MessageConsumer());
            consumerBus.SubscribeConsumer(() => new MessageConsumer());
            for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
                consumerBus.Publish(new SimpleMessage()
                    {CorrelationId = Guid.NewGuid(), MsgId = i});
            Console.WriteLine("Press ENTER Key to see how many you consumed");
            Console.ReadLine();
            Console.WriteLine("We consumed {0} simple messages. Press Enter to terminate the applicaion.",
                              MessageConsumer.Count);
            for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
                if (msgReceived[i])
                    Console.WriteLine("Received {0}", i);
            Console.ReadLine();
            consumerBus.Dispose();
            publisherBus.Dispose();

        }
    }
    public interface ISimpleMessage : CorrelatedBy<Guid>
    {
        int MsgId { get; }
    }
    public class SimpleMessage : ISimpleMessage
    {
        public Guid CorrelationId { get; set; }
        public int MsgId { get; set; }
    }
    public class MessageConsumer : Consumes<ISimpleMessage>.All
    {
        public static int Count = 0;
        public void Consume(ISimpleMessage message)
        {
            Program.msgReceived[message.MsgId] = true;
            System.Threading.Interlocked.Increment(ref Count);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
OK That does explain it to a degree; but there were no subscriptions in the original sample on the publisher bus; so they could never have been consumed by the publisher bus anyway so why load balance. Also I'm not sure you explanation stacks up; because those messages should never have been lost; they should always have been consumed. In our example there was only one consumer; the endpoint configuration should not determine load balancing; it's the registered consumers that should determine that. –  Bigtoe Sep 17 '12 at 12:36
    
It's not the bus instance that consumptions get associated with, it's the Receiver URI (which is how MT gives you load balancing across services in the first place). It makes perfect sense to me that MT would see this configuration and say "Ah I have two instances of the same bus (same Uri), and I've been told that that type of bus consumes message x, ergo I'll load balance the messages between them". tl;dr If you don't want to load balance two busses, give them different names –  Binary Worrier Sep 17 '12 at 12:47
1  
To be more instructional, it might be better if you kept track of which consumer consumed which message in the example, not sure which messages got consumed. But regardless you'll see the two consumers competing for messages. –  Travis Sep 17 '12 at 23:33
1  
@BinaryWorrier Yes, registering consumers as the bus is initialized is best. While you can dynamically register them, you could lose some messages that were already in the queue. It's why we support that in the configurator. –  Travis Sep 18 '12 at 16:47
1  
@mikebridge I don't think so. I'm still using an older version, I think you need to explicitly register the consumer to get the UnsubscribeAction. You can do *?temporary=true as the queue name to create a temp. queue for that consumer though. –  Travis Mar 11 '14 at 19:37

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