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+----------+--------------+-------------------------+
| ticketid | ticketpostid |           date          |
+----------+--------------+-------------------------+
|  1387935 |      3147808 | 2012-09-17 13:33:01     |
|  1387935 |      3147812 | 2012-09-17 13:33:41     |
|  1387938 |      3147818 | 2012-09-17 13:35:01     |
|  1387938 |      3148068 | 2012-09-17 13:37:01     |
|  1387938 |      3148323 | 2012-09-17 14:47:01     |
|  1387939 |      3147820 | 2012-09-17 13:36:01     |
|  1387939 |      3147834 | 2012-09-17 13:36:25     |
|  1387939 |      3147851 | 2012-09-17 13:41:01     |
|  1387939 |      3147968 | 2012-09-17 13:59:06     |
|  1387939 |      3147996 | 2012-09-17 14:03:01     |

This is a result of a query that I wrote. There are two and more than two rows with same ticketid. I need to find the time difference between first two date in each ticketid

Ex.

+----------+--------------+-------------------------+
| ticketid | ticketpostid |           date          |
+----------+--------------+-------------------------+
|  1387935 |      3147808 | 2012-09-17 13:33:01     |
|  1387935 |      3147812 | 2012-09-17 13:33:41     |
|  1387938 |      3147818 | 2012-09-17 13:35:01     |
|  1387938 |      3148068 | 2012-09-17 13:37:01     |
|  1387939 |      3147820 | 2012-09-17 13:36:01     |
|  1387939 |      3147834 | 2012-09-17 13:36:25     |

As a result;

+----------+--------------+
| ticketid |time diff(sec)|
+----------+--------------+
|  1387935 |      40      |
|  1387938 |      120     |
|  1387939 |      24      |

Can you tell me how I can do this?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
1  
Thanks for the data and expected result. It's great if you show this in INSERT form so it's easy to create as a sample, but this works. BTW, which PostgreSQL version? –  Craig Ringer Sep 17 '12 at 12:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

For PostgreSQL, I think you want the lag window function to compare the rows; it'll be much more efficient than a self-join and filter. This won't work with MySQL, as it still doesn't seem to support the standard SQL:2003 window functions; see below.

To find only the two lowest you can use the dense_rank window function over the ticketid, then filter the results to return only rows where dense_rank() = 2, ie row with the second-from-lowest timestamp, where lag() will produce the row with the lowest timestamp.

See this SQLFiddle which shows sample DDL and output.

SELECT ticketid, extract(epoch from tdiff) FROM (
  SELECT
      ticketid,
      ticketdate - lag(ticketdate) OVER (PARTITION BY ticketid ORDER BY ticketdate) AS tdiff,
      dense_rank() OVER (PARTITION BY ticketid ORDER BY ticketdate) AS rank
  FROM Table1
  ORDER BY ticketid) x
WHERE rank = 2;

I've used ticketdate as the name for the date column because date is a terrible name for a column (it's a data type name) and should never be used; it has to be double quoted in many situations to work.

The portable approach is probably the self-join others have posted. The window function approach above probably works on Oracle too, but doesn't seem to in MySQL. As far as I can find out it doesn't support the SQL:2003 window functions.

The schema definition will work with MySQL if you SET sql_mode = 'ANSI' and use timestamp instead of timestamp with time zone. It seems the window functions won't; MySQL chokes on the OVER clause. See this SQLFiddle.

share|improve this answer
select 
  ticketid
  ,time_to_sec(timediff(t2.date, t1.date))  as timediff
from table t1
join table t2 on t1.ticketid=t2.ticketid and t1.ticketpostid<t2.ticketpostid
share|improve this answer
2  
I think this approach is valid, however, it will return extra rows when there are more than 2 of the same ticketids. It would compare ticket1 to ticket2, ticket2 to ticket3, but also ticket1 to ticket3, which isn't desired. –  ers81239 Sep 17 '12 at 12:16
    
True, but the sql is done regarding the problem's data. It is easily modified to take in consideration 1st and 2nd, or 1st and last or whatever. It is done for 2 :) . –  Dumitrescu Bogdan Sep 17 '12 at 12:18

Try this query -

INSERT INTO ticket_post(ticketid, ticketpostid, date) VALUES
(1387935, 3147808, '2012-09-17 13:33:01'),
(1387935, 3147812, '2012-09-17 13:33:41'),
(1387938, 3147818, '2012-09-17 13:35:01'),
(1387938, 3148068, '2012-09-17 13:37:01'),
(1387938, 3148323, '2012-09-17 14:47:01'),
(1387939, 3147820, '2012-09-17 13:36:01'),
(1387939, 3147834, '2012-09-17 13:36:25'),
(1387939, 3147851, '2012-09-17 13:41:01'),
(1387939, 3147968, '2012-09-17 13:59:06'),
(1387939, 3147996, '2012-09-17 14:03:01');

SELECT
  ticketid,
  TIME_TO_SEC(TIMEDIFF((
    SELECT t.date FROM ticket_post t WHERE t.ticketid = t1.ticketid AND t.date > t1.date ORDER BY t.date LIMIT 1),
    MIN(date)
  )) diff FROM ticket_post t1
GROUP BY ticketid;

+----------+------+
| ticketid | diff |
+----------+------+
|  1387935 |   40 |
|  1387938 |  120 |
|  1387939 |   24 |
+----------+------+
share|improve this answer
    
I get different results and i'm a bit confused. Can you show your schema and sample data? Compare: sqlfiddle.com/#!9/846e8/6 –  Craig Ringer Sep 17 '12 at 13:02
    
I used data from question. –  Devart Sep 17 '12 at 13:53
    
Ah. There are two sample data sets there. I used the top one, you used the other. That explains it. My mistake. BTW, worth noting in your answer that it's MySQL only. –  Craig Ringer Sep 17 '12 at 13:54

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