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Just so everyone knows I have literally just started writing C#, and this is practice.

I found a GuessTheNumberGame code on the internet and have been trying to improve the basic game so that feedback is given, and the user can change the numbers. I had the program working but wanted to put the 'NumberChange' module separate from the 'Code' Method.

I have made a Main() Method inside of my 'GuessTheNumberGame' with executes the 'Code' method. The thing is when I go to change the number range the 'NumberChange' module won't change the values of 'Public Static int from' or 'Public static int to'; and because of this the range of the numbers remains the same.

Code below:

using System;

namespace GuessThatNumber
{
    class GuessTheNumberGame
    {
        static void Main()
        {
            Code(from, to, new_range);
        }

        public static int new_range = 0;
        public static int from = 1;
        public static int to = 10;

         static void Code(int from, int to, int new_range)
        {
            //int from = 1;   // The range the user will guess from.
            //int to = 10;    //The range the user will guess to.


            int guessedNumber;  //This will hold the value that the user guessed.
            int Counter = 0;    //Counter is used to count the number of guesses the user makes.
            int selection = 0;  //This value is for the selection at the start of the program
           //int new_range = 0;
            bool exit = false;

            while (exit == false)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("What would you like to do?");
                Console.WriteLine("1: Alter the range of guessed numbers? The range is currently from {0} to {1}.", from, to);
                Console.WriteLine("2: Try to guess the number?");
                Console.WriteLine("3: Exit the program?");
                Console.WriteLine("Please enter a number:");
                if (int.TryParse(Console.ReadLine(), out selection))
                {
                    if (selection == 2)
                    {
                        int randomNumber = new Random().Next(from, to);   //Generates a random number between the (from, to) variables.
                        Console.Write("The number is between {0} and {1}. ", from, to);
                        while (true)
                        {
                            Console.Write("Make a guess: ");
                            if (int.TryParse(Console.ReadLine(), out guessedNumber))
                            {
                                if (guessedNumber == randomNumber)
                                {
                                    Console.WriteLine("You guessed the right number!");
                                    if (Counter < 2)
                                    {
                                        Console.WriteLine("You guessed the number in only 1 turn! Amazing!");
                                        Console.WriteLine(" ");
                                    }
                                    else
                                    {
                                        Console.WriteLine("You guessed " + Counter + " times.");
                                        Console.WriteLine(" ");
                                    }
                                    break;
                                }
                                else
                                {
                                    Console.WriteLine("Your guess was too {0}.", (guessedNumber > randomNumber) ? "high" : "low");
                                    Counter = Counter + 1;
                                }
                            }
                            else
                            {
                                Console.WriteLine("Input was not an integer.");
                            }
                        }
                        //Console.WriteLine();
                        //Console.WriteLine("Press any key to exit.");
                        //Console.ReadKey();
                    }
                    else if (selection == 1)
                    {
                        NumberChange(from, to, new_range);
                    }

                    else
                    {
                        exit = true;
                    }
                }
            }
        }

        static int NumberChange(int from, int to, int new_range)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Please enter the number that the guess will start from.");
            int.TryParse(Console.ReadLine(), out new_range);
            from = new_range;
            Console.WriteLine("Now enter the number that the guess will go to.");
            int.TryParse(Console.ReadLine(), out new_range);
            to = new_range;
            return new_range;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
It is not a "void". It is a function. The return type of the function is void, but it is not correct, ever, to refer to a function definition as an instance of its return type. –  Ben Voigt Sep 17 '12 at 12:18

3 Answers 3

Please read about passing parameters by reference in C#.

So far, your parameters are passed by value. That means that upon calling Code() in the beginning of your program, the current values of public static int from and public static int to are copied into the parameters from and to.

The same happens when you invoke NumberChange(): The values of the parameters (local variables) from and to are copied into the parameters of the NumberChange() method with the same names, but if those values are modified within NumberChange, the new values don't ever get back from there; you have just modified the local variables from and to that only exist within the respective method.

Instead, you could declare your parameters using the ref keyword:

static int NumberChange(ref int from, ref int to, int new_range)

This means that you will have to invoke your method using the ref keyword for the respective arguments, too:

NumberChange(ref from, ref to, new_range);

Also, note two issues about your NumberChange() method:

  • You pass in a new_range argument, but you do not use it. In fact, it is overridden in your call to TryParse(). Therefore, you could simply declare int new_range as a local variable rather than passing it as a parameter.
  • You return a value from that method, but you do not use that value. Therefore, you could declare your method as void and drop the return statement.

Lastly, if you want your public static int from and public static int to variables to be changed by Code(), add the ref keyword analogously to NumberChange(). However, this is not really useful with your current code, as the program ends right after leaving Code() and the new values wouldn't be used at all.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. This helped out a lot. I wasn't aware of the ref keyword. Also the code() makes use of the NumberChange() because it loops back until exit is made True. So if the user decides to change the number range then this will remain in effect until exit is made true. –  Inafune Sep 17 '12 at 14:06
    
@Inafune: Sure, but that change of the number range takes place entirely within Code() and is not related to public static int from or public static int to. If an answer has solved your question/problem, please mark the answer as accepted. –  O. R. Mapper Sep 17 '12 at 14:15

You are using static variables, then passing them into a method that has access to them already. Passing them in essentially overrides the static versions with the local ones.

Change your method to this:

    private static void NumberChange() 
    { 
        int new_range;

        Console.WriteLine("Please enter the number that the guess will start from."); 
        int.TryParse(Console.ReadLine(), out new_range); 
        from = new_range; 
        Console.WriteLine("Now enter the number that the guess will go to."); 
        int.TryParse(Console.ReadLine(), out new_range); 
        to = new_range; 
    } 


    static void Code()
    {


    }

And delete this line:

public static int new_range = 0; 
share|improve this answer
    
This is not going to change anything as long as the same isn't done to the Code() method. –  O. R. Mapper Sep 17 '12 at 12:28
    
Thanks, missed that one. –  Chris Gessler Sep 17 '12 at 12:36

If you pass your variables by reference. Then the function your passing them can change them.

something like this

static int NumberChange(ref int from, ref int to, ref int new_range)
{
    //Your code here
}

Adn the same for your Code method

share|improve this answer
    
why did i get downvoted? –  Jordy van Eijk Sep 17 '12 at 12:38

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