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I'm saving and reloading a bunch of different objects all derived from a common base to a file, and obviously I need to store the class name (or something similar) in order to create the correct object type on reloading.

Saving is easy:

class Base 
{
  virtual string className() const = 0;

  void saveToFile()
  {
    write(className());
    ... other writing stuff
  }
}

class Derived1: public Base 
{
  string className() const { return "Derived1"; };
  ...
}

class Derived2: public Base 
{
  string className() const { return "Derived2"; };
  ...
}

and, loading is easy if you don't mind duplicating the strings...

static Base * Base::factory(const String &cname)
{
  if (cname == "Derived1")
    return new Derived1; 
  else if (cname == "Derived2")
    return = new Derived2; 
  else ...
}

void load()
{
  String cname = readString();

  Base * obj(Base::factory(cname);

  obj->readIt();
}

But, the duplicated strings offends my sense of DRY: Ideally, className() could be static virtual but that isn't allowed. I have a feeling that I'm missing an obvious 'clean' way round this, but I can't see it yet. Any suggestions?

Note: OK, code slightly tweaked using a factory method. Note that this doesn't actually answer the problem!

Note #2: The code above isn't trying to be a perfect representation of the ultimate factory pattern. I'm not concerned with unwanted linkage between base and derived classes, or potential difficulties in extending the hierarchy. I'm looking for answers that will simplify the code rather than complicate it.

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6 Answers 6

That's about the best you could do, you might clean it up a bit though by wrapping the if in a factory class.

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This is far from the best you can do, since you can use a singleton map of pointers, with each derived class responsible for registering its own pointer. –  James Kanze Sep 17 '12 at 13:30
    
@JamesKanze I don't see how that's any different (if you're talking to something similar to your answer). I don't regard how you actually store or get the class name as a problem... –  Luchian Grigore Sep 17 '12 at 13:33
    
It's radically different. In his version, the base class function must know all of the derived classes, and be modified every time you add a derived class. Using a singleton map of pointers to factory functions, each class is responsible for its own registration, and the base class never has any reference to the derived classes. –  James Kanze Sep 17 '12 at 13:49
    
@JamesKanze well if you used a factory, the base wouldn't need to know about the derived classes. –  Luchian Grigore Sep 17 '12 at 13:53
    
As he's done it, the factory has to know about the derived classes, which comes out to the same. –  James Kanze Sep 17 '12 at 14:43
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You can use a Factory Method (AKA Virtual Constructor) This is explained in the Design Patterns book and in many places throughout the Internet -- you can do a Google search on these terms. There is probably already a discussion of this in StackOverflow.

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Well, yes. But that doesn't solve the problem, it just moves it. –  Roddy Sep 17 '12 at 12:43
    
@Roddy It doesn't solve what problem? It avoids the chained ifs, and avoids the base class having to know about all of the derived classes. –  James Kanze Sep 17 '12 at 13:32
    
It would be great to have (i) an unambiguous reference to the book (e.g. an ISBN number), (ii) results of Google research, (iii) pointers to existing discussions on SO. –  jogojapan Sep 17 '12 at 13:45
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You obviously need the Factory pattern. Read more here http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/363338/Factory-Pattern-in-Cplusplus

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Two things here. First, to avoid having to write out the name twice, I've used something like the following in the past:

class Derived : public Base
{
    //  ...
    static char const* className() { return "Derived"; }
    virtual char const* getClassName() const { return className(); }
                 //  overrides virtual function in the base class...
};

In addition, if you want to be able to read the class from an external source, you'll need some sort of static factory function, which registers itself with a map of such functions. I'd go ahead and do this in Base:

class Base
{
    // ...
protected:
    class Factory
    {
    protected:
        Factory( std::string const& type );
    public:
        virtual Base* constructFromFile( std::istream const& source ) const = 0;
    };
    typedef std::map <std::string, Factory const*> FactoryMap;
    static FactoryMap& factories();

    template <typename Derived>
    class ConcreteFactory : public Factory
    {
    public:
        ConcreteFactory() : Factory( Derived::className() ) {}
        virtual Base* constructFromFile( std::istream const& source ) const
        {
            return new Derived( source );
        }
    };

public:
    static Base* readFromFile( std::istream& source );
};


Base::FactoryMap&
Base::factories()
{
    static FactoryMap theOneAndOnly;
    return theOneAndOnly;
}

Base::Factory::Factory( std::string const& type )
{
    std::pair <FactoryMap::iterator, bool> results 
        = factories().insert( std::make_pair( type, this ) );
    assert (results.second);
}

Base* Base::readFromFile( std::istream& source )
{
    std::string type = readType( source );
    FactoryMap::const_iterator factory = factories().find( type );
    if ( factory == factories().end() ) {
        throw UnknownType(...);
    }
    return factory->second->constructFromFile( std::istream& source );
}

Finally, for each derived class, you'll have to define a constructor taking an std::istream&, and a static instance of Base::ConcreteFactory <Derived>. (As written above, this must be a static member.)

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Id' make map of strings to functions, that create classes:

std::hash_map<std::string, std::function<Base*()> creators;

then, you can create function to fill map

template <typename T> void add()
{
    creators.insert(std::pair(T::class_name(), []()-> Base* { return new T(); }));
}

usage is simple:

//factory constructor
add<Derived1>();
add<Derived2>();

//creation
Base* r = 0;
auto it = creators.find(string);
if (it != creators.end()) {
    r = (*it)();
}
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Which, of course, will crash if the string doesn't correspond to a class which has been registered. –  James Kanze Sep 17 '12 at 13:28
1  
@JamesKanze, Exactly. I just showed proof of concept, but if you insist I will fix it –  Lol4t0 Sep 17 '12 at 13:34
1  
Well, simply mentioning that additional error handling is needed would go a long way. While that might seem obvious to you and me, if you look at the level of some of the people here... (You might also mention that you're using C++11, and that if you don't have access to C++11, some modifications might be in order. Same reason.) –  James Kanze Sep 17 '12 at 13:51
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I came across the same problem and found a pretty neat answer in this article: Industrial Strenght Pluggable Factories Close enough to James Kanze's answer, but I suggest you read this and try it yourself.

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