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I want to modify an existing XML file using xPath. If the node doesn't exist, it should be created (along with it's parents if neccessary). An example:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<configuration>
  <param0>true</param0>
  <param1>1.0</param1>
</configuration>

And here are a couple of xPaths I want to insert/modify:

/configuration/param1/text()         -> 4.0
/configuration/param2/text()         -> "asdf"
/configuration/test/param3/text()    -> true

The XML file should look like this afterwards:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<configuration>
  <param0>true</param0>
  <param1>4.0</param1>
  <param2>asdf</param2>
  <test>
    <param3>true</param3>
  </test>
</configuration>

I tried this:

import javax.xml.parsers.DocumentBuilderFactory;
import javax.xml.xpath.XPath;
import javax.xml.xpath.XPathConstants;
import javax.xml.xpath.XPathFactory;
import javax.xml.transform.Transformer;
import javax.xml.transform.TransformerFactory;
import javax.xml.transform.dom.DOMSource;
import javax.xml.transform.stream.StreamResult;

import org.w3c.dom.Document;
import org.w3c.dom.Node;
import org.w3c.dom.NodeList;

try {
  DocumentBuilderFactory domFactory = DocumentBuilderFactory.newInstance();
  Document doc = domFactory.newDocumentBuilder().parse(file.getAbsolutePath());
  XPath xpath = XPathFactory.newInstance().newXPath();

  String xPathStr = "/configuration/param1/text()";
  Node node = ((NodeList) xpath.compile(xPathStr).evaluate(doc, XPathConstants.NODESET)).item(0);
  System.out.printf("node value: %s\n", node.getNodeValue());
  node.setNodeValue("4.0");

  TransformerFactory transformerFactory = TransformerFactory.newInstance();
  Transformer transformer = transformerFactory.newTransformer();
  transformer.transform(new DOMSource(doc), new StreamResult(file));
} catch (Exception e) {
  e.printStackTrace();
}

The node is changed in the file after running this code. Exactly what I wanted. But if I use one of the below paths, node is null (and therefore a NullPointerException is thrown):

/configuration/param2/text()
/configuration/test/param3/text()

How can I change this code so that the node (and non existing parent nodes as well) are created?

EDIT: Ok, to clarify: I have a set of parameters that I want to save to XML. During development, this set can change (some parameters get added, some get moved, some get removed). So I basically want to have a function to write the current set of parameters to an already existing file. It should override the parameters that already exist in the file, add new parameters and leave old parameters in there.

The same for reading, I could just have the xPath or some other coordinates and get the value from the XML. If it doesn't exist, it returns the empty string.

I don't have any constraints on how to implement it, xPath, DOM, SAX, XSLT... It should just be easy to use once the functionality is written (like BeniBela's solution).

So if I have the following parameters to set:

/configuration/param1/text()         -> 4.0
/configuration/param2/text()         -> "asdf"
/configuration/test/param3/text()    -> true

the result should be the starting XML + those parameters. If they already exist at that xPath, they get replaced, otherwise they get inserted at that point.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you want a solution without dependencies, you can do it with just DOM and without XPath/XSLT.

Node.getChildNodes|getNodeName / NodeList.* can be used to find the nodes, and Document.createElement|createTextNode, Node.appendChild to create new ones.

Then you can write your own, simple "XPath" interpreter, that creates missing nodes in the path like that:

public static void update(Document doc, String path, String def){
  String p[] = path.split("/");
  //search nodes or create them if they do not exist
  Node n = doc;
  for (int i=0;i < p.length;i++){
    NodeList kids = n.getChildNodes();
    Node nfound = null;
    for (int j=0;j<kids.getLength();j++) 
      if (kids.item(j).getNodeName().equals(p[i])) {
    nfound = kids.item(j);
    break;
      }
    if (nfound == null) { 
      nfound = doc.createElement(p[i]);
      n.appendChild(nfound);
      n.appendChild(doc.createTextNode("\n")); //add whitespace, so the result looks nicer. Not really needed
    }
    n = nfound;
  }
  NodeList kids = n.getChildNodes();
  for (int i=0;i<kids.getLength();i++)
    if (kids.item(i).getNodeType() == Node.TEXT_NODE) {
      //text node exists
      kids.item(i).setNodeValue(def); //override
      return;
    }

  n.appendChild(doc.createTextNode(def));    
}

Then, if you only want to update text() nodes, you can use it as:

DocumentBuilderFactory domFactory = DocumentBuilderFactory.newInstance();
Document doc = domFactory.newDocumentBuilder().parse(file.getAbsolutePath());

update(doc, "configuration/param1", "4.0");
update(doc, "configuration/param2", "asdf");
update(doc, "configuration/test/param3", "true");
share|improve this answer
    
The JDK/JRE contains XPath (javax.xml.xpath) and XSLT (javax.xml.transform) APIs, so those approaches don't introduce any dependencies. –  Blaise Doughan Sep 17 '12 at 16:33
    
@BlaiseDoughan: but judging from his comments brimborium does not seem to like the APIs so much –  BeniBela Sep 17 '12 at 17:25
    
Thanks BeniBela. For me, that would be a clean solution and it does exactly what I want. You are right, I am not entirely convinced by XSLT, but that's maybe also because I don't seem to grasp the concept of it yet. I will also look into that. –  brimborium Sep 18 '12 at 8:18
    
I decided to use your solution and meanwhile upgrade my knowledge about XSLT. Because Dimitre's answer impressed me as well. ;) Thanks for your help. –  brimborium Sep 18 '12 at 12:13
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Here is a simple XSLT solution:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:template match="node()|@*">
     <xsl:copy>
       <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
     </xsl:copy>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="param1/text()">4.0</xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="/*">
  <xsl:copy>
   <xsl:apply-templates select="@*|node()"/>
     <param2>asdf</param2>
     <test><param3>true</param3></test>
  </xsl:copy>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

When this transformation is applied on the provided XML document:

<configuration>
    <param0>true</param0>
    <param1>1.0</param1>
</configuration>

the wanted, correct result is produced:

<configuration>
   <param0>true</param0>
   <param1>4.0</param1>
   <param2>asdf</param2>
   <test><param3>true</param3></test>
</configuration>

Do Note:

An XSLT transformation never "updates in-place". It always creates a new result tree. Therefore, if one wants to modify the same file, typically the result of the transformation is saved under another name, then the original file is deleted and the result is renamed to have the original name.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the example. As far as I understand, all existing nodes are copied, then param1's value is changed to 4.0 and then param2/3 are inserted. But I still have to check if the node already exists and then either update or insert it, right? –  brimborium Sep 17 '12 at 13:28
    
Hm, this just shifts my problem. I still have to create a file (it's just a XSLT file now) and have to check for every node if it's already available in the given XML file. Maybe I don't get the thing that makes this the simpler solution than using DOM? –  brimborium Sep 17 '12 at 13:36
1  
@brimborium, The xslt code is just a few lines (maybe twice as short as your current code). For more complex problems this ratio will be tens of times or even hundreds of times shorter. The XSLT code is also simpler (in most cases no explicit conditional instructions are necessary), extensible (due to templates and template matching), and maintainable (due to all of the previous facts). So, to summarize, one can clearly see the advantage of using XSLT when the problem is just a little-bit more complex. Look at the problems asked in the "xslt" tag and try to solve them without XSLT :) –  Dimitre Novatchev Sep 17 '12 at 14:31
1  
@brimborium, You don't have a well-defined problem. Please, edit the question and give us one or more XML documents and the exact wanted result each of them should be transformed to. If you don't miss a significant case, people will give you a solution that covers all the significant cases. If you fail to provide some significant case, then don't complain that people haven't been able to guess what was (not) in your head at that moment. –  Dimitre Novatchev Sep 17 '12 at 15:53
1  
@brimborium, Neither XSLT 1.0 or XSLT 2.0 have the capability of dynamic evaluation of a string that happens to contain a syntactically valid XPath expression. In XSLT 3.0 there will be a new instruction xsl:evaluate (w3.org/TR/xslt-30/#element-evaluate) doing exactly that, so your general problem can be solved in pure XSLT 3.0 -- and may be an early implementation such as Saxon 9.4 already supports that. –  Dimitre Novatchev Sep 18 '12 at 12:00
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