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So I am building a helper class that would store all get variables from a url, remove trailing spaces and return it so that other methods can use them.

The problem is that only the first value gets stored.

The url looks like: https://pay.paymentgateway.com/index.php?name=xyz&amount=10.30&checksum=abcd

My code outputs: Array ( [name] => xyz )

My code:

class helperboy
{

  protected $cleanvariables = array(); 

  public function store_get_variables($_GET)
    {

       foreach ($_GET as $key => $value)
          {
            return $this->cleanvalues[$key] = trim($value);
           }
    }

  protected function display_variables()
    {
      echo "<pre>";
      print_r($this->cleanvalues);
    }
 }

I know I am doing something silly and I would appreciate any help.

Also, how can I access specific variables like this in my other methods.:

$this->cleanvalues['name'];
$this->cleanvalues['amount'];
$this->cleanvalues['checksum'];
share|improve this question
3  
$_GET is already an array :? ($local = array_map('trim', $_GET);). What problem are you trying to solve? –  KingCrunch Sep 17 '12 at 13:08
    
If you're looking to validate and sanitize the input, take a look at filter_input() –  Niklas Modess Sep 17 '12 at 13:11
    
@KingCrunch: Ok, i honestly didn't know about array_map. What happens if i want to run a mysqli_escape_string on each on these get variables as well. I was thinking of writing a method that trims, escapes and stores all variables so that other methods can use them. Thoughts? –  user1675547 Sep 17 '12 at 13:12
    
You can write a method that does all your sanitisation then call that from array map. –  n00dle Sep 18 '12 at 11:14

2 Answers 2

Well, the problem is that...

public function store_get_variables($_GET)
{
  foreach ($_GET as $key => $value)
  {
    return $this->cleanvalues[$key] = trim($value);
  }
}

... the loop here will be executed just once. As soon as function hits return statement, it will abort this loop - and return immediately.

Yet I think there are some bigger problems here. First, I don't buy the idea of some omnipotent helper class that knows everything about everyone. If you intend to work with some cleaner request params, why don't just 'objectize' this instead:

class My_Http_Request
{
  private $request;
  protected function fillGetParams() {
    $this->request['get'] = array_map('trim', $_GET);
  }
  public function getTrimmedParam($name) {
    return $this->request['get'][$name];
  }
  public function __construct() {
    $this->fillGetParams();
  }
}

That's just an idea, not ready-made implementation (no checks for missing elements, no returning all params if 'getTrimmedParam' method is called without any arguments, etc.

share|improve this answer

your return statement is the problem....

class helperboy
{

  protected $cleanvariables = array(); 

  public function store_get_variables($_GET)
  {

   foreach ($_GET as $key => $value)
      {
         $this->cleanvalues[$key] = trim($value);
       }
   return $this->cleanvalues;
  }

 protected function display_variables()
  {
  echo "<pre>";
  print_r($this->cleanvalues);
 }
}
share|improve this answer

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