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I have a Core Data app that manages 10 different Entities. They're basically all the same and have the same attributes. (NSStrings and a UIImage) This results in one sqlite DB with 10 tables in it:

Collection A table
-item with attributes xyz
-item with attributes xyz
-item with attributes xyz
Collection B table
-item with attributes xyz
-item with attributes xyz
-item with attributes xyz
etc, etc

I realize now that this was a bad way to do it. I end up with 10 different view controllers and 10 different FRCs. I should have just had everything in one table with a "collectionX" attribute. This way I'd have all collection items under one table and depending on what collection the user is in, I could just return those items from the FRC with a predicate using the "collectionX" attribute.

What I'd like to do is migrate everything into one table and add an attribute for the collection name:

Collection table
-item from collection A (w/new "collectionX" attribute filled in as "collectionA")
-item from collection A (w/new "collectionX" attribute filled in as "collectionA")
-item from collection A (w/new "collectionX" attribute filled in as "collectionA")
-item from collection B (w/new "collectionX" attribute filled in as "collectionB")
-item from collection B (w/new "collectionX" attribute filled in as "collectionB")
-item from collection B (w/new "collectionX" attribute filled in as "collectionB")
etc, etc

So, with lightweight migration I should be able to go into all 10 entities and add the new "collectionX" attribute and populate it with a string for the associated collection.

Now the hard part... How do I now take all the entries in each table and copy them all over to a new one and delete the old 10 tables?

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1 Answer 1

If I were migrating from N databases to a single database, I don't know that I would even do the first step.

Instead, on application start-up, I would look for the "new" database. If it's not there, then I would look for the other databases, and kick off a background update.

In that background thread, create a complete core data stack for the new database, then loop through each old database. Create all MOCs using thread confinement to make using the thread easier.

For each "old" database, query all the objects, then loop through each object, assigning its values to a newly inserted object in the new database.

If all your entities have the same name, it's a piece of cake. If not, then you can just grab the property names from the NSEntityDescription, and loop through the properties. Using KVC (i.e., valueForKey: and setValue:forKey: make it easy to set the appropriate values for the new objects. Then, assign the appropriate category.

When done looping through all the objects, you now have duplicate database in the "new" database, so you can remove the old one. Close the "new" database, then go through your normal initialization phase to create the database used by

If you have lots of data, and want the app to function while migrating, you can even let the app run with the old data files while you perform the update in the background. When the update is done, you can then swap.

EDIT

What do you mean by "loop through each old database"? How do effectively "cut and paste" all that data? – RyeMAC3

Exactly that. Loop through each of the 10 databases. Something like:

for (NSString *dbName in databaseNames) {
    // Create a Core Data stack for the old database
    NSManagedObjectContext *oldDatabaseMOC = ...
    // Now, fetch objects from that database and insert new ones into the new database
}
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What do you mean by "loop through each old database"? How do effectively "cut and paste" all that data? –  RyeMAC3 Sep 17 '12 at 16:41
    
Oh....got it.Thanks. I'll have to play with all this later on. Still feel like a Core Data noob. –  RyeMAC3 Sep 17 '12 at 17:41

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