Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I will have a possibly very large JSON file and I want to stream from it instead of load it all into memory. Based on the following statement (I added the emphasis) from JSON::XS, I believe it won't suit my needs. Is there a Perl 5 JSON module that will stream the results from the disk?

In some cases, there is the need for incremental parsing of JSON texts. While this module always has to keep both JSON text and resulting Perl data structure in memory at one time, it does allow you to parse a JSON stream incrementally. It does so by accumulating text until it has a full JSON object, which it then can decode. This process is similar to using decode_prefix to see if a full JSON object is available, but is much more efficient (and can be implemented with a minimum of method calls).

To clarify, the JSON will contain an array of objects. I want to read one object at a time from the file.

share|improve this question
2  
I guess you've searched... are you looking for someone to vouch for a module? My rudimentary searches bring up JSON::Streaming::Reader and JSON::SL as potential candidates, but have no idea if they are suitable for your needs. –  Zaid Sep 17 '12 at 13:42
    
@Zaid I was just looking at the JSON modules, I didn't think to include stream in the name (I assumed, mistakenly it seems, that the top dogs would have this functionality). –  Chas. Owens Sep 17 '12 at 13:45

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Have you looked at JSON::Streaming::Reader which shows up as first while searching for 'JSON Stream' on search.cpan.org?

Alternatively JSON::SL found by searching for 'JSON SAX' - not quite as obvious search terms, but what you describe sounds like a SAX parsers for XML.

share|improve this answer
    
I am reading the docs to JSON::SL right now, I will look at JSON::Streaming::Reader next. –  Chas. Owens Sep 17 '12 at 13:55
    
As the author of JSON::SL, it offers both a pull-like interface (as featured in the example below) and an actual SAX-like interface (called Tuba). They are different, and the drawbacks of the SAX-style interface are visible (complex and slow..) –  mnunberg Sep 19 '12 at 3:57

In terms of ease of use and speed, JSON::SL seems to be the winner:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use JSON::SL;

my $p = JSON::SL->new;

#look for everthing past the first level (i.e. everything in the array)
$p->set_jsonpointer(["/^"]);

local $/ = \5; #read only 5 bytes at a time
while (my $buf = <DATA>) {
    $p->feed($buf); #parse what you can
    #fetch anything that completed the parse and matches the JSON Pointer
    while (my $obj = $p->fetch) {
        print "$obj->{Value}{n}: $obj->{Value}{s}\n";
    }
}

__DATA__
[
    { "n": 0, "s": "zero" },
    { "n": 1, "s": "one"  },
    { "n": 2, "s": "two"  }
]

JSON::Streaming::Reader was okay, but it is slower and suffers from too verbose an interface (all of these coderefs are required even though many do nothing):

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use JSON::Streaming::Reader;

my $p = JSON::Streaming::Reader->for_stream(\*DATA);

my $obj;
my $attr;
$p->process_tokens(
    start_array    => sub {}, #who cares?
    end_array      => sub {}, #who cares?
    end_property   => sub {}, #who cares?
    start_object   => sub { $obj = {}; },     #clear the current object
    start_property => sub { $attr = shift; }, #get the name of the attribute
    #add the value of the attribute to the object
    add_string     => sub { $obj->{$attr} = shift; },
    add_number     => sub { $obj->{$attr} = shift; },
    #object has finished parsing, it can be used now
    end_object     => sub { print "$obj->{n}: $obj->{s}\n"; },
);

__DATA__
[
    { "n": 0, "s": "zero" },
    { "n": 1, "s": "one"  },
    { "n": 2, "s": "two"  }
]

To parse 1,000 records it took JSON::SL .2 seconds and JSON::Streaming::Reader 3.6 seconds (note, JSON::SL was being fed 4k at a time, I had no control over JSON::Streaming::Reader's buffer size).

share|improve this answer

It does so by accumulating text until it has a full JSON object, which it then can decode.

This is what screws your over. A JSON document is one object.

You need to define more clearly what you want from incremental parsing. Are you looking for one element of a large mapping? What are you trying to do with the information you read out/write?


I don't know any library that will incrementally parse JSON data by reading one element out of an array at once. However this is quite simple to implement yourself using a finite state automaton (basically your file has the format \s*\[\s*([^,]+,)*([^,]+)?\s*\]\s* except that you need to parse commas in strings correctly.)

share|improve this answer
    
I updated the question, the JSON is an array of objects and I want one object at a time. –  Chas. Owens Sep 17 '12 at 13:28

Did you try to skip first right braket [ and then the commas , :

$json->incr_text =~ s/^ \s* \[ //x;
...
$json->incr_text =~ s/^ \s* , //x;
...
$json->incr_text =~ s/^ \s* \] //x;

like in the third example : http://search.cpan.org/dist/JSON-XS/XS.pm#EXAMPLES

share|improve this answer
    
I haven't tried anything yet, the docs seem to say that it still keeps stuff in memory (i.e. there is no flush like XML::Twig has). –  Chas. Owens Sep 17 '12 at 13:47
    
Actually, the fourth example seems to do what you want –  Nahuel Fouilleul Sep 17 '12 at 13:50
    
It appears so, but it looks crufty as hell. There are apparently other specialized modules on CPAN that may be able to hide that cruft from me. I am looking at them now. –  Chas. Owens Sep 17 '12 at 13:52

If you have control over how you're generating your JSON, then I suggest turning pretty formatting off and printing one object per line. This makes parsing simple, like so:

use Data::Dumper;
use JSON::Parse 'json_to_perl';
use JSON;
use JSON::SL;
my $json_sl = JSON::SL->new();
use JSON::XS;
my $json_xs = JSON::XS->new();
$json_xs = $json_xs->pretty(0);
#$json_xs = $json_xs->utf8(1);
#$json_xs = $json_xs->ascii(0);
#$json_xs = $json_xs->allow_unknown(1);

my ($file) = @ARGV;
unless( defined $file && -f $file )
{
  print STDERR "usage: $0 FILE\n";
  exit 1;
}


my @cmd = ( qw( CMD ARGS ), $file );
open my $JSON, '-|', @cmd or die "Failed to exec @cmd: $!";

# local $/ = \4096; #read 4k at a time
while( my $line = <$JSON> )
{
  if( my $obj = json($line) )
  {
     print Dumper($obj);
  }
  else
  {
     die "error: failed to parse line - $line";
  }
  exit if( $. == 5 );
}

exit 0;

sub json
{
  my ($data) = @_;

  return decode_json($data);
}

sub json_parse
{
  my ($data) = @_;

  return json_to_perl($data);
}

sub json_xs
{
  my ($data) = @_;

  return $json_xs->decode($data);
}

sub json_xs_incremental
{
  my ($data) = @_;
  my $result = [];

  $json_xs->incr_parse($data);  # void context, so no parsing
  push( @$result, $_ ) for( $json_xs->incr_parse );

  return $result;
}

sub json_sl_incremental
{
  my ($data) = @_;
  my $result = [];

  $json_sl->feed($data);
  push( @$result, $_ ) for( $json_sl->fetch );
  # ? error: JSON::SL - Got error CANT_INSERT at position 552 at json_to_perl.pl line 82, <$JSON> line 2.

  return $result;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.