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Take for example this format from IANA: http://www.iana.org/assignments/language-subtag-registry

%%
Type: language
Subtag: aa
Description: Afar
Added: 2005-10-16
%%
Type: language
Subtag: ab
Description: Abkhazian
Added: 2005-10-16
Suppress-Script: Cyrl
%%
Type: language
Subtag: ae
Description: Avestan
Added: 2005-10-16
%%

Say I open the file:

import urllib
f = urllib.urlopen("http://www.iana.org/assignments/language-subtag-registry")
all=f.read()

Normally you would do like this

lan=all.split("%%") 

the iterate lan and split("\n") then iterate the result and split(":"), is there a way to to this in python in one batch without the iteration and the output still be like this: [[["Type","language"],["Subtag", "ae"],...]...]?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As a single comprehension:

raw = """\
%%
Type: language
Subtag: aa
Description: Afar
Added: 2005-10-16
%%
Type: language
Subtag: ab
Description: Abkhazian
Added: 2005-10-16
Suppress-Script: Cyrl
%%
Type: language
Subtag: ae
Description: Avestan
Added: 2005-10-16
%%"""


data = [
     dict(
         row.split(': ')
         for row in item_str.split("\n")
         if row  # required to avoid the empty lines which contained '%%'
     )
     for item_str in raw.split("%%") 
     if item_str  # required to avoid the empty items at the start and end
]
>>> data[0]['Added']
'2005-10-16'
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This is the answer I was looking for +1/accept –  Eduard Florinescu Sep 10 '13 at 10:23
    
@EduardFlorinescu: Just noticed this question was a year old. Oh well - happy to help –  Eric Sep 10 '13 at 10:24

I don't see any sense in trying to do this in a single pass, if the elements you are getting to after each split are semantically diffent.

You could start by spliting by ":" -- that wold get you to the fine grained data - but what good would that be, if you wold not know were does this data belong?

That said, you could put all the levels of separation inside a generator, and have it yield dictionary-objects with your data, ready for consunption:

def iana_parse(data):
    for record in data.split("%%\n"):
        # skip empty records at file endings:
        if not record.strip():
            continue
        rec_data = {}
        for line in record.split("\n"):
            key, value = line.split(":")
            rec_data[key.strip()] = value.strip()
        yield rec_data

It can be done as a one liner as you request in the comments - but as I commented back, It could be written to fit as a single expression in one line. It took more time to write than the example above, and would be nearly impossible to maintain. The code in the example above unfolds the logic in a few lines of code, that are placed "out of the way" - i.e. not inline where you are deaing witht he actual data, providing readability and maintainability for both tasks.

That said, parsing as a structure of nested lists as you want can be done thus:

structure = [[[token.strip() for token in line.split(":")] for line in record.split("\n") ] for record in data.split("%%") if record.strip() ]
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So is not posible to get it like this [[["Type","language"],["Subtag", "ae"],...]...] without iteratin it? –  Eduard Florinescu Sep 17 '12 at 13:55
    
@EduardFlorinescu not really, besides if you call a function to generate this output for you it iterates internally, what is so bad about iteration? –  ted Sep 17 '12 at 14:01
1  
It could be written to fit as a single expression in one line. It woudl take more time to write than the example above, and would be nearly impossible to maintain. The code in the example above unfolds the logic in a few lines of code, that are placed "out of the ay" - i.e. not inline where you are deaing witht he actual data, providing readability and maintainability for both tasks. –  jsbueno Sep 17 '12 at 14:01
1  
@jsbueno: +1 for guessing what is intended here and supplying a beautiful generator for it. –  ted Sep 17 '12 at 14:02
1  
@EduardFlorinescu: try partition then, it always returns a three tuple. The new line 8 would read: key, value = line.partition(':')[::2] (or key, _, value = line.partition(':') but be wary of problems with the i18n module which binds _ to its gettext function. –  ted Sep 18 '12 at 4:56

You can use itertools.groupby:

ss = """%%
Type: language
Subtag: aa
Description: Afar
Added: 2005-10-16
%%
Type: language
Subtag: ab
Description: Abkhazian
Added: 2005-10-16
Suppress-Script: Cyrl
%%
Type: language
Subtag: ae
Description: Avestan
Added: 2005-10-16
"""
sss = ss.splitlines(True) #List which looks like you're iterating over a file object


import itertools

output = []
for k,v in itertools.groupby(sss,lambda x: x.strip() == '%%'):
    if(k):  #Hit a '%%' record.  Need a new group.
        print "\nNew group:\n"
        current = {}
        output.append(current)
    else:   #just a regular record, write the data to our current record dict.
        for line in v:
            print line.strip()
            key,value = line.split(None,1)
            current[key] = value

One benefit of this answer is that it doesn't require you to read the entire file. The whole expression is evaluated lazily.

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Regexes, but I don't see the point:

re.split('%%|:|\\n', string)

Here multiple patterns were chained using the or | operator.

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+1 for the "I don't see the point" :-) –  jsbueno Sep 17 '12 at 13:57
    
But then you don't know when one record ends and the next begins, unless you hard-code a requirement that each record has to start with the Type field, for example. You also make it impossible to have a delimiter in a field value, which may not be a serious issue in this particular case (and/or you could require newlines on both sides of %% if you like). –  tripleee Sep 17 '12 at 15:03
    
@tripleee: how about splitting with lookahead patterns? I can do the same for delimiters (they would have to be escaped or you assume that one only takes the first delimiter). I could show you some regexes for this if you are interested, but you might just as well head over to the regex doc linked in the awnser. Besides, this was just an awnser to do what the user asked, I consider this approach highly inappropiate for parsing purposes. Even for csv files I consider it wiser to consume the fields one by one, this makes detecting escaped delimiters easier. (I know there is the csv module) –  ted Sep 18 '12 at 5:01

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