Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm working on a RESTful webapp with three maven projects. This is my maven setup (striped from some details)

The Client (second release):

<project>
    <groupId>com.mycompany.app</groupId>
    <artifactId>app-client</artifactId>
    <version>2.0</version>
    ...
    <dependency>
        <groupId>com.mycompany.app</groupId>
        <artifactId>app-model</artifactId>
        <version>2.0</version>
    </dependency>
</project>

The model (second release):

<project>
    <groupId>com.mycompany.app</groupId>
    <artifactId>app-model</artifactId>
    <version>2.0</version>
</project>
...
<plugin>
    <groupId>org.jvnet.jaxb2.maven2</groupId>
    <artifactId>maven-jaxb2-plugin</artifactId>
    <configuration>
        <generatePackage>com.mycompany.app.model.v2</generatePackage>
    </configuration>
</plugin>

The Webapp (second release):

<project>
    <groupId>com.mycompany.app</groupId>
    <artifactId>app-webapp</artifactId>
    <version>2.0</version>
    ...
    <dependency>
        <groupId>com.mycompany.app</groupId>
        <artifactId>app-model</artifactId>
        <version>1.0</version>
    </dependency>
    <dependency>
        <groupId>com.mycompany.app</groupId>
        <artifactId>app-model</artifactId>
        <version>2.0</version>
    </dependency>
</project>

For every release I update the package name for the model to ensure unique classnames.

Class Foo in com.mycompany.app:app-model:1.0

package com.mycompany.app.model.v1;

public class Foo {
    private String name;
}

Class Foo in com.mycompany.app:app-model:2.0

package com.mycompany.app.model.v2;

public class Foo {
    private String name;
    private int age;
}

In the first release everything works because the webapp only depends on com.mycompany.app:app-model:1.0. In the second release maven decides to only depend on com.mycompany.app:app-model:2.0. This is normal behavior and I understand why this is a good thing in normal cases. Nevertheless. My Backwords compapility code (in the server) want's to use the classes in com.mycompany.app:app-model:1.0 since clients released in that release uses those classes. And the code for newer clients (version 2.0) want's to use the com.mycompany.app:app-model:2.0 classes.

I'm sure there is a way of tricking maven to depend on both, but how? Usually when I end up in these kinds of situations, alarms goes of in my head, and there usually is something wrong with my way of solving the problem. But I can't seem to find another approch here, that doesn't include other "bigger" drawbacks :( Idees anyone?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

So, to answer my own question, this is what I came up with. I think it's pretty strait forward and not to much out-of-the-box.

Originally i had 3 artefacts:

  • com.mycompany.app:app-client
  • com.mycompany.app:app-model
  • com.mycompany.app:app-webapp

I ended up introducing one more artefact:

  • com.mycompany.app:app-depend

This artifacts only job is to bundle all the released model artecacts into one dependable artefact. To do this I followed Esko's suggestion and used the maven plugin:

  • org.apache.maven.plugins:maven-dependency-plugin

The goal being unpack. This puts all the .class files in one directory under target and since I made sure every model release generated classes in a unique package it worked out fine without any overwrites. I only included the .class files and omitted all other (MANIFEST.MF, pom.xml and pom.properties)

After that the trix was simple. All I had to do was to add a resource to the artifact and since it doesn't contain any other sources it became a new dependable artifact. Nice!

Now, for all this to work the way I wanted, I declared the new artifact as a dependency in my webapp artifact, giving me access to all the classes in all the versions of the model. The client on the other hand, still only needs to depend on the model, since the client is only interested in the latest model version (for the time of the release).

I also manages to design the webapp so that if client from release 1 calls the webapp, he gets a response in model version 1, which he understands. And at the same time, when a client from release 2 calls the webbap, he gets a response in model version 2, which he understands. This was the goal all along, and I think this will promote versioning av my api.

I should mention that the webapp has it's own domain model (separate but similar to the presentation model) so there is a conversion from domain to presentation being done for all requests. For release 1 the two models are pretty much the same, but in release 2 the domain have changed and so has the (latest) presentation. The webapp does it's best to convert the domain to both presentation model 1 and 2, but model 1 might not have all the information. Now if the domain model changes so much that it doesn't make any sense to try to convert it into presentation model 1, I think that is the time to stop supporting that model...

The depend maven pom ended up looking something like this (for release 2)

<project>

  <groupId>com.mycompany.app</groupId>
  <artifactId>app-depend</artifactId>
  <version>2.0</version>
  <packaging>jar</packaging>

  <build>
    <resources>
      <resource>
        <!-- this is where 'unpack' puts the files -->
        <directory>${project.build.directory}/dependency</directory>
        <filtering>false</filtering>
      </resource>
    </resources>
    <plugins>
      <plugin>
        <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
        <artifactId>maven-dependency-plugin</artifactId>
        <version>2.5.1</version>
        <executions>
          <execution>
            <id>unpack</id>
            <!-- we must do the 'unpack' before the building the jar -->
            <phase>generate-sources</phase>
            <goals>
              <goal>unpack</goal>
            </goals>
            <configuration>
              <artifactItems>
                <artifactItem>
                  <groupId>com.mycompany.app</groupId>
                  <artifactId>app-model</artifactId>
                  <version>1.0</version>
                  <type>jar</type>
                  <includes>com/mycompany/app/model/v1/**</includes>
                </artifactItem>
                <artifactItem>
                  <groupId>com.mycompany.app</groupId>
                  <artifactId>app-model</artifactId>
                  <version>2.0</version>
                  <type>jar</type>
                  <includes>com/mycompany/app/model/v2/**</includes>
                </artifactItem>
                <!-- future releases will go here -->
              </artifactItems>
            </configuration>
          </execution>
        </executions>
      </plugin>
    </plugins>
  </build>

</project>

That's IT folks!

share|improve this answer

You can use Maven Dependency plugin's copy goal to copy those artifacts into a directory in your project. It should be OK with copying multiple versions of the same artifact. Though it won't yet help with compiling the code against those different versions (you might need to configure the additional classpath as hand-written compiler arguments).

Or then just change the artifact ID for each version.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok. so this would be the "tricking maven" solution and as I said, this makes me think I might be off to a bad start with this design. Anyways, I have not tinkered about with maven, starting with what you suggester, tried out some other plugins as well (some old goodies came up, such as the assemble plugin), and came up with a solution that I think will be ok. When doing this kind of stuff I'd like to keep it at a minimum, not the least for maintenance sake. easy to read is easy to understand. :) –  Thobias Bergqvist Sep 19 '12 at 0:36

The problem goes deeper than Maven. By default the JVM will only load one version of a class. If two versions of com.mycompany.app.model.ModelObject (for instance) are on your program's classpath, when one of your classes requests ModelObject, the classloader will go out and load the first one it finds.

One way I've seen this handled in public web services is to namespace all classes based on their version. So for instance, version 1 model classes could go in package com.mycompany.app.model_1 and version 2 model classes in com.mycompany.app.model_2. You (and the client) may end up writing quite a bit of extra code in this case though.

Probably a simpler way is to just host a separate webapp for each version of the model you want to support, with the webapp path based on the model version. So in this case, version 1 webapp might be hosted at http://app.mycompany.com/webapp_1/... and version 2 at http://app.mycompany.com/webapp_2/.... (The web server uses separate classloaders for each webapp so webapp_1 and webapp_2 can use different versions of the same class.)

(If you're feeling adventurous, you could also try setting up your own separate classloaders for each model version within a single webapp. I don't know if I'd recommend that though.)

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answer matts. I think I need to clearify. What I mean with "For every release I update the package name for the model to ensure unique classnames" is just what you describe. i.e. class Foo will be com.mycompany.app.model.v1.Foo and com.mycompany.app.model.v2.Foo depending on release so they will be unique between themselfs and can live in the same classpath. Any further thoughts? –  Thobias Bergqvist Sep 17 '12 at 18:47
    
Oops, I am sorry! I missed that part. (blush) I think the easiest solution might be to just have different artifact IDs for each version. This will help ensure that all your Maven plugins will interpret the dependencies correctly, and reinforce the fact that v2 is not a drop-in replacement for v1. –  matts Sep 18 '12 at 15:12
    
Yes, maybe that is the way to go. It will definitely make maven happier. But on the other hand, Maven is just my building tool and shouldn't dictate the way i design my projects. Also it seems to me that version is just the right concept for handling api evolution. Thirdly com.mycompany.app:app-model-v1:1.0 seems a bit redundant and confusing to me. Nevertheless, There certainly is a point in using maven the maven way... I will elaborate on @Esko's suggestion a bit before I make any decisions and Thank you for your input. –  Thobias Bergqvist Sep 18 '12 at 21:11

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.