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I have an application to copy data off onto external disks. The copy requests are stored in a MySQL database and will be read from multiple copy machines, which run a bash script to pick up requests. Once a request is picked up, it is set as "inprogress" in the database. However, I'm trying to avoid a situation where multiple machines read the request close together and start copying the same data.

I was going to use table locking to do this, but I'm struggling because a table lock expires when a session expires so if I do:

mysql="mysql -h dbhost -u user -pPassword diskcopydb"
echo "LOCK tables diskcopy WRITE;" | $mysql
echo "SELECT SQL_NO_CACHE * FROM diskcopy WHERE status=\"request\"" | $mysql

the lock has actually expired by the time it gets to getting the requests, so the race condition persists. There is a question here:

MySQL from the command line - can I practically use LOCKs?

where the SQL commands are packaged into a block and they are piped together into MySQL, but I need to get output from MySQL half way through to pick up the requests. Does somebody have a recipe for this? It seems like it ought to be a fairly common use-case...

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3 Answers 3

This question is actually answered here:

Bulk insert of MySQL related tables from bash

To paraphrase, bidirectional communication with MySQL is tricky with Bash and it's easier to use a "proper" programming language like Perl or Python where you can open and hold a connection.

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Impossible Is Possible!

>but I need to get output from MySQL half way through to pick up the requests. Does somebody have a recipe for this?

Here is my solution demo:

#!/bin/bash
################################################################################
#                  Bash synchronous client-server                              #
#                              or                                              #
#     Bash parallel processes with synchronized rendezvous points              #
#                              or                                              #
#          Bash interprocess communication with named pipes                    #
################################################################################
#Declare your session 'globals'
args=    #command line arguments are stored here
DIR=     #script's current path is stored here

#Early store your bash args before you lose them
for arg in "$@"; do
   args[i]=$arg
   (( i+=1 ))
done
################################################################################
## Initialize constants                                                       ##
#------------------------------------------------------------------------------#
# Explain more...                                                              #
################################################################################
function init_vars() {
   #absolute path of this script
   DIR=$( cd "$( dirname "$0" )" && pwd )
   #global MYSQL_PASS is defined in ~/.profile
   #this is the file where we store MySQL root password
   if [[ ! $MYSQL_PASS ]]; then
      MYSQL_PASS='.mysqlpass'
   fi
   #do some other stuff here...
}

################################################################################
## Rotate over passed arguments                                               ##
#------------------------------------------------------------------------------#
#Parse array 'args' based on the logic of your command line argument syntax    #
#Say, '--db <database>' denotes the processing of one database, '--db all' of  #
#all databases etc.                                                            #
#Linux utilities have contradicting rules for such kind of argument processing #
#(full of crap!), i.e. see tar: tar -xvf or tar --xfv or tar xvf, mysql -p     #
#<pass> or mysql -p=<pass> or mysql -p'<pass>' (???)                           #
################################################################################
function parse_args() {
   #your logic goes here
}

################################################################################
## Opens a MySQL client session                                               ##
#------------------------------------------------------------------------------#
# For security reasons password is kept in a file given by MYSQL_PASS.         #
################################################################################
function mysql_client() {
   mysql --host=127.0.0.1 --port=3306 --default-character-set=utf8 -u root -p"$( cd $DIR; cat $MYSQL_PASS )"
}

################################################################################
## A job dispatcher                                                           ##
#------------------------------------------------------------------------------#
# This thread initiates the workers and also reads intermediate results from   #
# the spawned jobs. We don't want to parallelize the whole part of a job but   #
# rather to put some parts to run in parallel with the dispatcher and some     #
# parts in a sequential order determined by what we call rendezvous points.    #
# See the diagram: A, B, C, D, E and F are events or actions during the life of#
# a program.                                                                   #
#                                                                              #
#  dispatcher                                                                  #
#     |         start                                                          #
#     A     ---------------->    worker                                        #
#     |                            |                                           #
#     B (read blocks)              C                                           #
#     |                   signals  |                                           #
#     B (unblocks)<--------------- D (write blocks)                            #
#     |                            |                                           #
#     E (1st set of results)       F                                           #
#     |                            |                                           #
# We can only guarantee that E comes after D or, D->E in time but E->F or F->E #
# and B->C or C->B (we don't care)                                             #
################################################################################
function dispatcher() {
   #go to the directory of this script
   cd $DIR
   #make a temporary directory secured in 'time & space'
   TMPDIR=$( mktemp -d XXXXXXXXXX )
   #catch exit of this script and delete temporary folder
   trap 'cd $DIR && rm -rf "$TMPDIR"' EXIT
   #move into the temporary folder
   cd ${TMPDIR}
   #create named pipes-global to all functions of this script
   TMPSQL=mysql-$RANDOM.$RANDOM.$RANDOM.$$
   TMPSCRIPT=myscript-$RANDOM.$RANDOM.$RANDOM.$$
   mkfifo $TMPSQL
   mkfifo $TMPSCRIPT
   #exec 3<> ${DIR}/${TMPDIR}/$TMPSQL || (echo 'error'; exit 1)
   #exec 4<> ${DIR}/${TMPDIR}/$TMPSCRIPT || ( echo 'error'; exit 1)
   echo '===1.PARENT=== Starting background jobs...'
   echo 'We can guarantee the succession only of 2->3,4 and 5->6,7 but NOT 3->4 or 6->7!'
   worker &
   ##################################
   cat $TMPSQL #make a blocking read!
   ##################################
   echo '===4.PARENT=== ...1st query has been read'
   ##################################
   cat $TMPSQL #make a blocking read!
   ##################################
   echo '===7.PARENT=== ...2nd query has been read'
   #don't you dare to exit!
   ##################################
   cat $TMPSQL #make a blocking read!
   ##################################
}

################################################################################
## A job spawned by the dispatcher                                            ##
#------------------------------------------------------------------------------#
################################################################################
function worker() {
   echo "===2.CHILD=== Executing 1st query......writing to $TMPSQL"
   #the dash symbol '-' makes tabs at the beginning of line to be
   #ignored inside the here-doc but improves formation!
   mysql_client <<- QUERY
\! tee $TMPSQL
use test;
select * from customers;
\! echo '===3.CHILD=== End 1st query'
#####################################
#\. $TMPSCRIPT
#####################################
QUERY

   echo "===5.CHILD=== Executing 2nd query......writing to $TMPSQL"
   mysql_client <<- QUERY
\! tee $TMPSQL
use test;
select * from cars;
\! echo '===6.CHILD=== End 2nd query'
#####################################
#\. $TMPSCRIPT
#####################################
QUERY

   echo '===8.CHILD=== End of background jobs'
   echo > $TMPSQL
}

   #parse command line arguments
   parse_args

   #initialize variables
   init_vars

   #call dispatcher
   dispatcher

Suppose you have a 'test' database then you can see the following output:

===1.PARENT=== Starting background jobs...
We can guarantee the succession only of 2->3,4 and 5->6,7 but NOT 3->4 or 6->7!
===2.CHILD=== Executing 1st query......writing to mysql-30627.1495.5394.7533
===4.PARENT=== ...1st query has been read
id_customer firstname   secondname
1   John    Pincolo
2   Mark    Denonto
3   Ann Curtis
4   Jeny    Wirth
===3.CHILD=== End 1st query
===5.CHILD=== Executing 2nd query......writing to mysql-30627.1495.5394.7533
===7.PARENT=== ...2nd query has been read
id_car  type    plate   date_rent   date_returned
1   fiat    BG-457  2012-07-18 00:00:00 2012-07-20 00:00:00
2   renault AS-1234 2012-07-20 00:00:00 2012-07-25 00:00:00
3   fiat    JYB-2856    2012-06-23 00:00:00 2012-06-24 00:00:00
===6.CHILD=== End 2nd query
===8.CHILD=== End of background jobs

As you can see between 2 and 5 lies my first database result set! You wanted intermediate results between your query and the "main" program and you have them!

You may wonder: "Hey, I want to obtain a database lock, stop the session in terms of freeze while my 'main' program does something else!" Well, there is an answer too. Function 'worker' has 2 commented commands:

#####################################
#\. $TMPSCRIPT
#####################################

by enabling them your execution hangs!!! That's it! Now, you can start doing things in the dispatcher and when you finish send an 'echo' like this:

echo > $TMPSCRIPT

By adding this line of code to our workers we converted to blocking threads both the dispatcher and the worker: now both listen each other. Schematically:

  dispatcher
     |         start
     A     ---------------->    worker
     |                            |
     B (read blocks)              C
     |                   signals  |
     B (unblocks)<--------------- D (write blocks)
     |                            |
     E (1st set of results)       F
     |                            |
     |                            G (read blocks)
     |  signals                   |
     H ---------------->          G (unblocks)
     | (write blocks)             |

if you need more excitement what about sending

echo 'set @x=@x+1;' > $TMPSCRIPT

where '@x' a user defined variable! What we have here? Well, we simply 'injected' live code to our sql job! More than great!!!

Now, one can obtain a LOCk of a database, make a logical backup, stop and continue the mysql client and do whatever he wants while the database LOCK is still active!

It can be even better: what about creating binary backups? (just saved you 2,000-10,000 USD per year, see: https://shop.oracle.com)

It can be better than better: a bunch of say 10 databases can be locked and a backup can start, the first that finishes send an acknowledgement to the dispatcher which adds another database in the list until it becomes empty! Only remember that foe every worker we need 2 locks for bidirectional locking.

We can even start 3 dispatchers at the same time as it is impossible to face a collition of their named pipes as they are unique in space.

That's my 2,000$ advice

Sweet!

(centurian)

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As one can see, I block the execution of my dispatcher as this is the best practice in client-server terms. But why? Without blocking the exit if you try to run many times the program (another principle of parallel programming) you'll see this error: "sh: getcwd() failed: No such file or directory" meaning your server just deleted the pipes while a worker was using them! –  centurian Nov 27 '12 at 23:48
    
...and I shouldn't forget to stress the danger of this line in dispatcher: "trap 'cd $DIR && rm -rf "$TMPDIR"' EXIT", a wrong cd somewhere else in the program can push us to another location just before exiting and the unfortunate result would be the deletion of another folder-maybe the one with your 2,000 photos? To be absolutely sure replace 'rm' with 'ls' during debugging! –  centurian Nov 27 '12 at 23:56

Run your SQLs in the same connection:

mysql="mysql -h dbhost -u user -pPassword diskcopydb"
echo "LOCK tables diskcopy WRITE;SELECT SQL_NO_CACHE * FROM diskcopy WHERE status=\"request\"" | $mysql

Otherwise the lock is for a session that is already dead in the second time you run mysql.

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But I need to do other processing based on the query after the lock is acquired (and edit the table based on the processing) before I release the lock. –  user1677770 Sep 17 '12 at 15:05
1  
The trick is to use the same connection, it's possible to do that using shell script but it will require running mysql in the background and piping it's input/output - I suggest you switch to something else like php, perl, python or whatever script that can open a connection, keep it alive and process the data. –  iMoses Sep 17 '12 at 19:24

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