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In this user control the designer adds items to this control on the form and it dynamically places them on the form. Unfortunately once these controls are shown on the form in designer I can then grab one and pull it right outside of the custom control.

How do I prevent this?

EDIT

Please note that I am not looking for a solution or alternative to handling radio buttons, that is just the control of choice in this scenario. If it helps insert any type of control you want here (Button, Label, TextBox, CustomControl1), this problem is about handling a property with a collection/array type. The bottom line is that the user shouldn't be able to grab any of these controls in designer where an instance of this control has been defined and move it elsewhere. Just like a DataGridView or ListView albeit different types of objects, the user must use properties to change the contents of these controls. That is the beharior I am looking for.

RBLTest.cs

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Data;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows.Forms;

namespace WFCL_Library
{
    public partial class RBLTest : UserControl
    {
        private RadioButton[] _items;

        private int leftSpacing = 100;
        private int topSpacing = 25;

        public RBLTest()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }

        private void RadioButtonList_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            int curLeftPos = 0;
            int curTopPos = 0;
            foreach (RadioButton rb in _items)
            {
                rb.Location = new Point(curLeftPos, curTopPos);
                rb.Size = new Size(85, 17);

                curLeftPos += leftSpacing;

                if (curLeftPos > this.Width)
                {
                    curLeftPos = 0;
                    curTopPos += topSpacing;
                }

                this.Controls.Add(rb);                
            }
        }

        [DesignerSerializationVisibility(DesignerSerializationVisibility.Content)]
        public RadioButton[] Items
        {
            get
            {
                return _items;
            }
            set
            {
                _items = value;
            }
        }
    }       
}

RBLTest.Designer.cs

namespace WFCL_Library
{
    partial class RBLTest
    {
        /// <summary> 
        /// Required designer variable.
        /// </summary>
        private System.ComponentModel.IContainer components = null;

        /// <summary> 
        /// Clean up any resources being used.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="disposing">true if managed resources should be disposed; otherwise, false.</param>
        protected override void Dispose(bool disposing)
        {
            if (disposing && (components != null))
            {
                components.Dispose();
            }
            base.Dispose(disposing);
        }

        #region Component Designer generated code

        /// <summary> 
        /// Required method for Designer support - do not modify 
        /// the contents of this method with the code editor.
        /// </summary>
        private void InitializeComponent()
        {
            this.SuspendLayout();
            // 
            // RBLTest
            // 
            this.AutoScaleDimensions = new System.Drawing.SizeF(6F, 13F);
            this.AutoScaleMode = System.Windows.Forms.AutoScaleMode.Font;
            this.Name = "RBLTest";
            this.Size = new System.Drawing.Size(407, 44);
            this.Load += new System.EventHandler(this.RadioButtonList_Load);
            this.ResumeLayout(false);

        }

        #endregion

    }
}
share|improve this question
    
It is very unclear how the designer could ever assign the Items property. The simple explanation is that you put the radio buttons on top of the UserControl, not inside of them. Enabling design mode for controls inside a UserControl after it was placed on a form requires a custom designer. – Hans Passant Sep 17 '12 at 18:55
    
I don't want design controls for controls inside of a user control that's just it. Build this control, drag it from the toolbox onto the form and select the items property and add new instances. It creates radio buttons and displays them accordingly as expected. What's unexpected is that you can just grab one of those radio buttons and rip it right out of the custom control and drop it outside of that custom control onto the form. The button is still part of the items list in the custom control even though now its displayed outside of it. – Mohgeroth Sep 17 '12 at 19:00
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Well, it depends on how you want to do it. First off, I'm not a big fan of allowing direct access to controls on my user controls. For this reason, I make sure none of the controls are publically accessable. What I do is make everything private (or sometimes protected since it's nice for derived classes to have some flexibility) then I create properties to access the controls' properties that must be accessible and events to be handled by parent containers.

If all that really doesn't matter to you, then I believe the property you are looking for is the Control.Locked property. In your code above once you've added the dynamic control to the Controls collection, set the Locked to true. So:

            this.Controls.Add(rb);
            rb.Locked = true;


Try something like this:

    public class RadioButtonProperties
    {
        private RadioButton _realtedRadioButton = new RadioButton();

        public RadioButtonProperties(RadioButton radio)
        {
            _realtedRadioButton = radio;

            Name = radio.Name;
            Checked = radio.Checked;
            //add other properties
        }

        public string Name
        {
            get
            {
                //logic to to handle if checkbox is null here

                return _realtedRadioButton.Name;
            }

            set
            {
                //logic to to handle if checkbox is null here

                _realtedRadioButton.Name = value;
            }
        }

        public bool Checked
        {
            get
            {
                //logic to to handle if checkbox is null here

                return _realtedRadioButton.Checked;
            }

            set
            {
                //logic to to handle if checkbox is null here

                _realtedRadioButton.Checked = value;
            }
        }
    }

Now in your custom control, instead of giving public access to your entire radiobox array, you give access to a representation of the array, exposing only the radiobox properties that you want. For example:

    [DesignerSerializationVisibility(DesignerSerializationVisibility.Content)]  
    public List<RadioButtonProperties> Items { get; set; }
share|improve this answer
    
Locked is only a property in designer and is not accessable in code behind. This was my first thought as there is already a proprety for this but alas, does not work. – Mohgeroth Sep 17 '12 at 16:56
    
In that case, you really must not allow public access to your controls. If all you want to do is un/check checkboxes or see if checkbox is un/checked, then you can have a little fun doing this using Indexed Properties. eg: myControl[0] = true; Otherwise use private controls with public methods. – saml Sep 17 '12 at 17:31
    
This has nothing to do with setting properties, a designer can click and drag a radio button outside of the custom control onto the form registering it to both creating big problems :\ – Mohgeroth Sep 17 '12 at 18:30
    
In fact I have to wonder if that is exactly what it has to do with. You allow public access to your Items array which gives public access to everything stored within it. See my updated answer where I provide code to support what I mean, it might be worth a shot. – saml Sep 18 '12 at 15:17
1  
I should had read your initial paragraph a few times, accessability is the key to this. Well earned, works like a charm! It should be noted that in doing this RadioButtonProperties requires a default constructor with zero parameters to work 'out of the box' with visual studio or else adding an item from proreties throws an exception. – Mohgeroth Sep 18 '12 at 16:27

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