Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Considering:

abstract class Base {
  def something() = println("Base")
}

trait TraitA extends Base {
    abstract override def something() = { super.something(); println("TraitA"); }
}

class Child extends Base {
    override def something() {
        println("Child")
    }
}

And then:

val x = new Child with TraitA
x.something()

I get:

Child
TraitA

But if I use:

class Child extends Base with TraitA {
    override def something() {
        println("Child")
    }
}

val x = new Child
x.something()

I'd get only:

Child

So what are the differentes of using a trait at construction site or declaration site? Can I have the first behavior (stackable traits) while extending/with'ing the trait in the declaration of the class?

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Stackable traits in Scala refers to being able to mix in multiple traits that work together to apply multiple modifications to a method. This involves invoking super.theMethod and modifying its input and/or output. But what is super in the context of a trait? The class (or trait) the trait extends from? The class the trait is being mixed into? It depends! All the mixed in traits and all the superclasses are linearized. super invokes the nearest preceding definition further up the chain.

read full post

In your case:
1. super.something() == Child.something()
2. super.something() == Base.something() and Child.something() overrides whole chain

Type of mixin doesn't matter:

class Child2 extends Child with TraitA

val x2 = new Child2
x2.something() 
/* 
   Child
   TraitA
*/

class Child3 extends Base with TraitA
val x3 = new Child3
x3.something()
/* 
   Base
   TraitA
*/
share|improve this answer
add comment

In the first example, you override the method of Base first and then you mix TraitA which will stack.

In the second example, first you mix TraitA and then you override the resulting (stacked) method.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.