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I have multiple nested items of data in each row of a large JSON file.

An example of a row from the JSON file: {“Key1”:{“Key2”:”value2”},{“Key3”:{“Key4:”Value4”}}}}

The file is almost 2GB in size, I need to convert it to CSV.

So there, are 2 major issues here:

  1. How do I represent n dimensional data in a 2d CSV format?
  2. Even if I came up with an approach to represent the data in CSV, how would I convert it from JSON?

Any thoughts would be much appreciated.

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Can the json data items be recursively nested? If so, CSV does not seem to be good fit, since as you noted, CSV is a 2d format. –  Hans Then Sep 17 '12 at 15:32
    
Why does it need to be in csv? Might shed some light on a possible solution. –  redrah Sep 17 '12 at 15:56
    
It needs to be in a flat file format, I need to understand the data so that I can model it in Cognos BI. –  Ricky Sep 18 '12 at 7:38

1 Answer 1

1/ That's a problem. That really depends on the structure of your file. In this case, you could use 3 columns, like

firstKey secondKey value
Key1     Key2      value2
Key3     Key4      value4

but that could also be very different

2/ you'd need a stream parsing method. most likely your entire json structure won't fit in memory

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The term 'stream parsing method', are you referring to a script such as Python? If so, can you provide some alternative options? Can it be written in C# / Visual Studio? –  Ricky Sep 18 '12 at 7:40
    
Also, are you aware of any online resources that may provide a template for such a script? I'm looking for something where all the required libraries are listed and examples are provided for referencing object / items in my JSON file. –  Ricky Sep 18 '12 at 7:41
    
no. by streaming method, i mean that you cannot parse all the json at once, meaning that you'll be using an event based parser, in which the smallest needed subset of data will be in memory at the same time. –  njzk2 Sep 18 '12 at 8:27

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