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Is this the best way to keep a simple track of changes to a database row:

ALTER TRIGGER [dbo].[trg_121s] 
ON  [dbo].[121s]
  AFTER UPDATE
AS 
BEGIN
-- SET NOCOUNT ON added to prevent extra result sets from
-- interfering with SELECT statements.
SET NOCOUNT ON;

-- Insert statements for trigger here

update dbo.[121s]
set modified=getdate()
where id in 
(select distinct ID from Inserted)

END

So any update to a row in [121s] will result in the modified column being updated.

It works, but I'm not sure if it's the best way to achieve this.

I'm a litle confused over this line:

(select distinct ID from Inserted)

...and how it knows it's getting the correct row ID.

Thanks for any confirmation/clarification,

Mark

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Using GetDate() within a query is chasing a moving target, impacts performance, and may produce curious results, e.g. as the date changes. It is almost always a better idea to capture the current date/time in a variable and then use that value as needed. This is more important across multiple statements as in a stored procedure. The most common reason to use GetDate() multiple times is when capturing the start and end times for a long running operation. –  HABO Sep 17 '12 at 15:22
1  
@HABO unless it is absolutely critical that all of the rows are marked with the exact same update timestamp, I don't think there's much of a concern in this case. –  Aaron Bertrand Sep 17 '12 at 15:23
    
I do not know for sure, but I think in a statement the getdate() will return the same date/time for every row. –  Dumitrescu Bogdan Sep 17 '12 at 15:26
    
@DumitrescuBogdan I am fairly certain there are cases where that isn't true, and it's re-evaluated per-row, but I will confess that I haven't tested if this is one of them. –  Aaron Bertrand Sep 17 '12 at 15:30
    
@AaronBertrand don't understand me wrong, whenever I write an sp I always start by defining some constants(like time). But I am yet to see inside a select/update/insert, different dates from getdate(). As I said, i do not know it for sure. I will investigate. –  Dumitrescu Bogdan Sep 17 '12 at 15:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

inserted is a pseudo-table and it definitely contains all the right rows that were affected by the UPDATE statement (and I assume DISTINCT isn't necessary, if ID a primary key - though it's hard to tell what the table is with a name like 121s). Whether all of them actually had changed values is another thing you may consider validating before applying the modified date/time. Barring that, I would probably do it this way:

ALTER TRIGGER [dbo].[trg_121s] 
ON [dbo].[121s]
AFTER UPDATE
AS 
BEGIN
  SET NOCOUNT ON;

  UPDATE t SET modified = CURRENT_TIMESTAMP
   FROM dbo.[121s] AS t
   WHERE EXISTS (SELECT 1 FROM inserted WHERE ID = t.ID);
END
GO

If you want to have a 100% foolproof guarantee that they're all updated with the same timestamp (though I don't know if I've ever seen multiple values in this use case):

ALTER TRIGGER [dbo].[trg_121s] 
ON [dbo].[121s]
AFTER UPDATE
AS 
BEGIN
  SET NOCOUNT ON;

  DECLARE @ts DATETIME;
  SET @ts = CURRENT_TIMESTAMP;

  UPDATE t SET modified = @ts
   FROM dbo.[121s] AS t
   WHERE EXISTS (SELECT 1 FROM inserted WHERE ID = t.ID);
END
GO

And if you want to ensure that the update only occurs if, say, the column foo changed value, you could say:

  UPDATE t SET modified = @ts
   FROM dbo.[121s] AS t
   INNER JOIN inserted AS i
   ON t.ID = i.ID
   AND t.foo <> i.foo;

It becomes more complex if foo is nullable, but that's the general pattern.

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Thank you - I've marked this as the answer, as I know from your original comment you must have started working on it straight away. I really appreciate the other answers too, and have +1d them - so thank you all - the help here is incredible! –  Mark Tait Sep 17 '12 at 15:36
    
Just a quick query to expand on your answer if you don't mind... I did see another reference to updating the time stamp, only if certain columns (could be more than just one, as in your example) are changed: if update([name]) or update([address]) begin.... is that possible? (for info 121s is a table of one to one meetings with staff, to give an update on performance etc) - thanks again, Mark –  Mark Tait Sep 17 '12 at 15:40
    
@fixit no, you can't rely on that. If I say UPDATE foo SET bar = bar or bar is already 1 and I say UPDATE foo SET bar = 1 then UPDATE(bar) will return true, even though I haven't changed the value. –  Aaron Bertrand Sep 17 '12 at 15:45
    
thank you - so if you did want to have a check on two columns, would you setup two triggers? –  Mark Tait Sep 17 '12 at 17:58
    
@fixit absolutely not. AND (t.foo <> i.foo OR t.bar <> i.bar) –  Aaron Bertrand Sep 17 '12 at 17:58

Inserted is a table that contains the rows affected by the operation which fired the trigger(insert/update). So your trigger here is correct. If the Id is primary key, then you do not need the distinct(select id from Inserted is enough). If Id is not primary key, then your trigger is false, as you might end up updating more then you should.

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Though many, not just on Stackoverflow, but across the world will tell you triggers are evil, I'm going to say they hold value when they aren't abused. Here, if you wanted to use this trigger, it seems valid and the Inserted table contains the rows that were updated by the statement that fired this trigger - it's correct except that DISTINCT can probably be removed if ID is the primary key.

However, another option if you have the flexibility, is to use a timestamp column instead. But, do not be confused, the timestamp column does not correlate to a date and time. So if you need the date and time, stick with what's there.

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Using timestamp is actually the opposite of what I would suggest. Typically people have to move away from timestamp because what they actually wanted was the date/time, not some unreadable rowversion binary value that doesn't help them track down when a row was modified at all. –  Aaron Bertrand Sep 17 '12 at 15:28
    
I'm aware of timestamp - I think it's just poorly worded - I know it's being depreciated in the future. –  Mark Tait Sep 17 '12 at 15:45

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