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I have a table with this schema -

CREATE TABLE `ox_data_summary_device_hourly` (
  `data_summary_device_hourly_id` bigint(20) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `date_time` datetime NOT NULL DEFAULT '0000-00-00 00:00:00',
  ...

  ...
  PRIMARY KEY (`data_summary_device_hourly_id`),
  KEY `ox_data_summary_device_daily_date_time` (`date_time`),
  KEY `ox_data_summary_device_daily_ad_country_date_time` (`ad_id`,`date_time`),
  KEY `ox_data_summary_device_daily_zone_id_date_time` (`zone_id`,`date_time`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB AUTO_INCREMENT=3478837682 DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1

So, the following indexes are set on a table -

 KEY `ox_data_summary_device_daily_date_time` (`date_time`),
 KEY `ox_data_summary_device_daily_ad_country_date_time` (`ad_id`,`date_time`),
 KEY `ox_data_summary_device_daily_zone_id_date_time` (`zone_id`,`date_time`)

I have this explain query on this table with filter on date_time -

explain SELECT *

FROM ox_data_summary_device_hourly data_hourly 

WHERE 
data_hourly.date_time >= '2012-09-01 00:00:00' AND data_hourly.date_time < '2012-09-15 13:00:00' 

GROUP BY data_hourly.type ORDER BY data_hourly.type DESC

Here is the output showing that the ox_data_summary_device_daily_date_time index is not applying -

enter image description here

However, if I change the date filter in the above mentioned query to the following -

data_hourly.date_time >= '2012-09-01 00:00:00' AND data_hourly.date_time < '2012-09-14 13:00:00'

i.e. if I query for 1st Sep to 14 sep instead of 1st to 15 sep, the ox_data_summary_device_daily_date_time index applies. I further checked that if the end date of the range is anything after 15 sep, the index does not apply.

I am puzzled. I checked that there is data in the table for date range >= 15th Sep.

Any ideas?

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2 Answers

I'm not sure why the index is not being used, but you might solve this by adding the FORCE INDEX option:

SELECT *
FROM ox_data_summary_device_hourly data_hourly 
FORCE INDEX (ox_data_summary_device_daily_date_time)
WHERE 
data_hourly.date_time >= '2012-09-01 00:00:00' AND 
data_hourly.date_time < '2012-09-15 13:00:00' 
GROUP BY data_hourly.type ORDER BY data_hourly.type DESC

Also, you may find using the BETWEEN operator easier to read, and it may even perform slightly better:

SELECT *
FROM ox_data_summary_device_hourly data_hourly 
FORCE INDEX (ox_data_summary_device_daily_date_time)
WHERE 
data_hourly.date_time BETWEEN 
    '2012-09-01 00:00:00' AND 
    '2012-09-15 13:00:00' - INTERVAL 1 SECOND
GROUP BY data_hourly.type ORDER BY data_hourly.type DESC
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Yes applying the force index seems to work, but I wonder why is it needed... –  Sandeepan Nath Sep 17 '12 at 15:46
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Sounds like the optimizer to me - it thinks there are too many rows being examined by the query to make the index useful. That explains why it's OK for a smaller range, too.

I think you can either query for smaller date ranges or use a DATE instead of a DATETIME.

Running ANALYZE or OPTIMIZE might help, too. Here's a decent overview article

Good luck.

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