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I am trying to wrap my head around the numpy implementation of PEP3118. How exactly does buffer access work in numpy.

>>> p = numpy.getbuffer(numpy.arange(10))
>>> p
<read-write buffer for 0x1003e5b10, size -1, offset 0 at 0x1016ab4b0>
>>> numpy.frombuffer(p)
array([  0.00000000e+000,   4.94065646e-324,   9.88131292e-324,
     1.48219694e-323,   1.97626258e-323,   2.47032823e-323,
     2.96439388e-323,   3.45845952e-323,   3.95252517e-323,
     4.44659081e-323])

So I am getting unexpected returns. I would expect to see an array with 10 elements from 0-9. I can get into the array and read/write though.

>>> j = numpy.frombuffer(p)
>>> j
array([  0.00000000e+000,   4.94065646e-324,   9.88131292e-324,
     1.48219694e-323,   1.97626258e-323,   2.47032823e-323,
     2.96439388e-323,   3.45845952e-323,   3.95252517e-323,
     4.44659081e-323])
>>> j += 1
>>> j
array([ 1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.])

So it looks like the buffer is initializing to all zeros, which I can then write to. The functionality that I am expecting is to be able to build the array (with arange or asarray) directly to the buffer with getbuffer. Is that not possible?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You have a simple dtype problem. The buffer you create with

np.getbuffer(np.arange(10))

has a dtype=int, because np.arange uses dtype=int by default.

Then, when you try to read your buffer with

np.frombuffer(p)

you're in fact using the dtype=float default of np.frombuffer. Instead, use

np.frombuffer(p, dtype=int)

et voilà, you get

array([0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9])
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Let me add some remarks to the excellent existing answer by Pierre.

You need getbuffer only if you have to slice an ndarray: you can retrieve the python buffer object associated with the whole array via the data attribute

>>> import numpy as np
>>> a = np.arange(10)
>>> a.data == np.getbuffer(a)
True

On the contrary, you do not need to pass an actual buffer object to the frombuffer function, every object that exposes the buffer interface is good.

>>> np.frombuffer(a, a.dtype)
array([0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9])
>>> np.frombuffer(a)
array([  0.00000000e+000,   4.94065646e-324,   9.88131292e-324,
         1.48219694e-323,   1.97626258e-323,   2.47032823e-323,
         2.96439388e-323,   3.45845952e-323,   3.95252517e-323,
         4.44659081e-323])
>>> import array
>>> c = array.array('i', range(10))
>>> np.frombuffer(c, np.int32)
array([0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9], dtype=int32)
>>> np.frombuffer(c)
array([  2.12199579e-314,   6.36598737e-314,   1.06099790e-313,
         1.48539705e-313,   1.90979621e-313])

When decoding a buffer object, you have to know the correct dtype as the examples above demonstrate. To be more precise, buffer objects do not have a dtype: they are just a stream of binary data. Instead ndarray objects have a dtype that dictates how the underlying binary data is interpreted.

To answer your question: every numpy ndarray exposes the buffer interface. You can access the buffer or a slice of it via the data descriptor or the getbuffer function. You can create ndarray's from object exposing the buffer interface by means of the frombuffer function. Since buffer (as opposed to ndarrays) do not have dtype information, you should always explicitly specify how the buffer has to be interepreted via the dtype argument to frombuffer.

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What a wonderful addendum to Pierre's answer. The additional detail is quite appreciated. –  Jzl5325 Sep 18 '12 at 18:50

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