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Given an array , we need to find the length of longest sub-sequence with alternating increasing and decreasing values.

For example , if the array is , 7 4 8 9 3 5 2 1 then the L = 6 for 7,4,8,3,5,2 or 7,4,9,3,5,1 , etc.

It could also be the case that first we have small then big element.

What could be the most efficient solution for this ? I had a DP solution in mind. And if we were to do it using brute force how would we do it (O(n^3) ?) ?

And it's not a homework problem.

share|improve this question
    
Task from SPOJ?) – Gloomcore Sep 17 '12 at 16:10
    
Nope. I don't do SPOJ. More like a variant of the LIS. – h4ck3d Sep 17 '12 at 16:17
    
Have you google longest bitonic subsequence ? Lots of answers ... – Kwariz Sep 17 '12 at 16:29
1  
@Kwariz Bitonic sequence is one which is first increasing and then decreasing. Here it is ALTERNATING. – h4ck3d Sep 17 '12 at 16:32
    
@sTEAK look at the algorithms, it is trivial to change an increasing first algorithm to a decreasing first algorithm. Worst case you have to run it twice – Kwariz Sep 17 '12 at 16:34
up vote 13 down vote accepted

You indeed can use dynamic programming approach here. For sake of simplicity , assume we need to find only the maximal length of such sequence seq (it will be easy to tweak solution to find the sequence itself).

For each index we will store 2 values:

  • maximal length of alternating sequence ending at that element where last step was increasing (say, incr[i])
  • maximal length of alternating sequence ending at that element where last step was decreasing (say, decr[i])

also by definition we assume incr[0] = decr[0] = 1

then each incr[i] can be found recursively:

incr[i] = max(decr[j])+1, where j < i and seq[j] < seq[i]
decr[i] = max(incr[j])+1, where j < i and seq[j] > seq[i]

Required length of the sequence will be the maximum value in both arrays, complexity of this approach is O(N*N) and it requires 2N of extra memory (where N is the length of initial sequence)

simple example in c:

int seq[N]; // initial sequence
int incr[N], decr[N];

... // Init sequences, fill incr and decr with 1's as initial values

for (int i = 1; i < N; ++i){
    for (int j = 0; j < i; ++j){
         if (seq[j] < seq[i]) 
         {
             // handle "increasing" step - need to check previous "decreasing" value
             if (decr[j]+1 > incr[i])  incr[i] = decr[j] + 1;
         }
         if (seq[j] > seq[i]) 
         {
             if (incr[j]+1 > decr[i])  decr[i] = incr[j] + 1;
         }
    }
}

... // Now all arrays are filled, iterate over them and find maximum value

How algorithm will work:

step 0 (initial values):

seq  = 7   4 8 9 3 5 2 1
incr = 1   1 1 1 1 1 1 1
decr = 1   1 1 1 1 1 1 1

step 1 take value at index 1 ('4') and check previous values. 7 > 4 so we make "decreasing step from index 0 to index 1, new sequence values:

incr = 1 1   1 1 1 1 1 1
decr = 1 2   1 1 1 1 1 1

step 2. take value 8 and iterate over previous value:

7 < 8, make increasing step: incr[2] = MAX(incr[2], decr[0]+1):

incr = 1 1 2   1 1 1 1 1
decr = 1 2 1   1 1 1 1 1

4 < 8, make increasing step: incr[2] = MAX(incr[2], decr[1]+1):

incr = 1 1 3   1 1 1 1 1
decr = 1 2 1   1 1 1 1 1

etc...

share|improve this answer
    
Could you give a dry run of your algorithm please? For sake of more clarity. Thanks. – h4ck3d Sep 17 '12 at 16:08
    
@sTEAK. sorry, you mean add some pseudocode or anything else? (my English lets me down here :( ) – Vladimir Sep 17 '12 at 16:10
    
yes pseudo-code and an example of it. that is applying your algorithm on an example – h4ck3d Sep 17 '12 at 16:16
    
in step 2 , why are you checking for 4<8 and then again doing incr[2] = ... , why not decr[2] = ... ? – h4ck3d Sep 19 '12 at 7:32
    
@sTEAK. as 4 < 8 we can only make "increasing" step from 4 to 8 - so we need to check the length of sequence that ended with 4 and had decreasing last step (that is, decr[1]) to make sequence alternate. As 8 is bigger than all previous items we cannot make "decreasing" step to it so decr[2] remains 1 – Vladimir Sep 19 '12 at 7:57

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