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I'm trying to implement a bicubic interpolation algorithm to reconstruct higher-resolution data from a heightmap. After some falstarts and sets of instructions containing nearly-incomprehensible math (it's been some years since I had calculus and I no longer remember much beyond the basics) , I've found the article "Bicubic Interpolation for Image Scaling" by Paul Bourke containing what appeared to be a fairly simple and easy to implement algorithm. http://paulbourke.net/texture_colour/imageprocess/

However, instead of producing an interpolation result even remotely resembling the one on Wikipedia, instead I'm getting this (from the same input data):

enter image description here

What is causing the error, and more importantly - how to fix it?

PHP code below (yes, this probably should - and will - be reimplemented in C; when it's working)

class BicubicInterpolator
{
    private $data;
    public function Set_data($d)
    {
        $this->data=$this->denull($d);
    }
    public function Interpolate($dx,$dy)
    {   
        $r=0;
        for ($m=-1; $m<2; $m++)
            for ($n=-1; $n<2; $n++)
                $r+=$this->data[$m+1][$n+1] * $this->R($m-$dx) * $this->R($dy-$n);
        return $r;
    }
    private function denull($d)
    {
        //Substituting null values with nearest known values as per "A Review of Some Image Pixel Interpolation Algorithms" by Don Lancaster (supposed to produce same output as example image)
        if ($d[0][1]===null) for ($i=0; $i<4; $i++) $d[0][$i]=$d[1][$i];
        if ($d[1][0]===null) for ($i=0; $i<4; $i++) $d[$i][0]=$d[$i][1];
        if ($d[3][1]===null) for ($i=0; $i<4; $i++) $d[3][$i]=$d[2][$i];
        if ($d[1][3]===null) for ($i=0; $i<4; $i++) $d[$i][3]=$d[$i][2];
        return $d;
    }
    function R($x)
    {
        return (      $this->P($x+2)
            - 4 * $this->P($x+1)
            + 6 * $this->P($x)
            - 4 * $this->P($x-1) )/6;
    }
    function P($x)
    {
        if ($x>0) return $x*$x*$x;
        return 0;
    }
share|improve this question
    
Here is the example on Wikipedia that I'm talking about: upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d5/… –  Michał Gawlas Sep 17 '12 at 16:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In the end I have switched to a different algorithm, based on a combination of the one outlined by Don Lancaster with derivative and cross-derivative formulae from Chapter 3.6 of "Numerical Recipes in C" (2nd Edition), p136.

This is combined with two minor tweaks:

  1. The function calculation caches an intermediary set of values for last y-coordinate (a successive Interpolate(x,y) call with the same y argument will require four multiplications and three additions, cutting down on processing time)
  2. One set of derivatives is accessible as public, allowing the last two to be passed along as first two for a grid cell in coordinates (x, y+1) and halving the amount of calculations needed to get each of those derivative sets for each cell.

This is the implementation, working with no apparent glitches:

class BicubicInterpolator
{
    private $last_y;
    private $last_y_a;
    private $a;
    public $x;
    public function __construct()
    {
        for ($i=0;$i<4;$i++)
            $this->x[$i]=false;
    }
    public function Set_data($d)
    {
        $d=$this->denull($d);
        $x=$this->x;
        for ($j=1; $j<3; $j++)
            for ($k=1; $k<3; $k++)
            {
                $r=($j-1)*2+($k-1);
                $w[$r]=$d[$j][$k];
                //Derivatives and cross derivatives calculated as per Numerical Recipes in C, 2nd edition.
                if (!$x[$r]) $x[$r]=( $d[$j][$k+1] - $d[$j][$k-1] ) / 2;
                $y[$r]=( $d[$j+1][$k] - $d[$j-1][$k] ) / 2;
                $z[$r]=( $d[$j+1][$k+1]-$d[$j+1][$k-1]-$d[$j-1][$k+1]+$d[$j-1][$k-1] )/4;
            }
        $this->x=$x;
        /* Coefficient calculation as per "A Review of Some Image Pixel Interpolation Algorithms" by Don Lancaster, 
        + addressing changed to (x,y) instead of (y,x)
        + reformulated to minimize the number of multiplications required */
        $this->a[0][0] = $w[0];
        $this->a[1][0] = $y[0];
        $this->a[2][0] = 3*($w[2]-$w[0])-2*$y[0]-$y[2];
        $this->a[3][0] = 2*($w[0]-$w[2])+$y[0]+$y[2];
        $this->a[0][1] = $x[0];
        $this->a[1][1] = $z[0];
        $this->a[2][1] = 3*($x[2]-$x[0])-2*$z[0]-$z[2];
        $this->a[3][1] = 2*($x[0]-$x[2])+$z[0]+$z[2];
        $this->a[0][2] = 3*($w[1]-$w[0])-2*$x[0]-$x[1];
        $this->a[1][2] = 3*($y[1]-$y[0])-2*$z[0]-$z[1];
        $this->a[2][2] = 9*($w[0]-$w[1]-$w[2]+$w[3])+6*($x[0]-$x[2]+$y[0]-$y[1])+3*($x[1]-$x[3]+$y[2]-$y[3])+4*$z[0]+2*($z[1]+$z[2])+$z[3];
        $this->a[3][2] = 6*($w[1]+$w[2]-$w[3]-$w[0])+4*($x[2]-$x[0])+3*($y[1]-$y[0]-$y[2]+$y[3])+2*($x[3]-$z[0]-$z[2]-$x[1])-$z[1]-$z[3];
        $this->a[0][3] = 2*($w[0]-$w[1])+$x[0]+$x[1];
        $this->a[1][3] = 2*($y[0]-$y[1])+$z[0]+$z[1];
        $this->a[2][3] = 6*($w[1]+$w[2]-$w[0]-$w[3])+3*(-$x[0]-$x[1]+$x[2]+$x[3])+4*($y[1]-$y[0])+2*($y[3]-$y[2]-$z[0]-$z[1])-$z[2]-$z[3];
        $this->a[3][3] = 4*($w[0]-$w[1]-$w[2]+$w[3])+2*($x[0]+$x[1]-$x[2]-$x[3]+$y[0]-$y[1]+$y[2]-$y[3])+$z[0]+$z[1]+$z[2]+$z[3];

        $this->last_y=false;
    }
    public function Interpolate($x,$y)
    {
        if ($y!==$this->last_y)
        {
            for ($i=0; $i<4; $i++)
            {
                $this->last_y_a[$i]=0;
                for ($j=0; $j<4; $j++)
                    $this->last_y_a[$i]+=$this->a[$j][$i]*pow($y,$j);
            }
            $this->last_y=$y;
        }
        $r=0;
        for ($i=0; $i<4; $i++)
            $r+=$this->last_y_a[$i]*pow($x,$i);
        return $r;
    }
    private function denull($d)
    {
        //Substituting null values with nearest known values 
        //as per "A Review of Some Image Pixel Interpolation Algorithms" by Don Lancaster
        if ($d[0][1]===null)    for ($i=0; $i<4; $i++)  $d[0][$i]=$d[1][$i];
        if ($d[1][0]===null)    for ($i=0; $i<4; $i++)  $d[$i][0]=$d[$i][1];
        if ($d[3][1]===null)    for ($i=0; $i<4; $i++)  $d[3][$i]=$d[2][$i];
        if ($d[1][3]===null)    for ($i=0; $i<4; $i++)  $d[$i][3]=$d[$i][2];
        return $d;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
what exactly does this function take as parameter? How should I represent the image? –  user1843507 Mar 18 '13 at 12:55
    
It takes a 4x4 array of values representing the grid values at 16 points, the inner four of which mark the corners of the area you will be getting the values of - keep in mind that the addressing used by Interpolate() is in the range of 0 to 1. Interpolation of larger than 4x4 grids can be done by splitting them up (indeed, that is what I have done back then). It was designed for interpolating numeric data which was then converted into false color images. Interpolating actual images can be done, but you'd have to split up the color channels into individual arrays. –  Michał Gawlas Aug 7 '13 at 17:26

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