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I have a table with two columns.

+------+------+
| data | num  | 
+------+------+
| a    |      | 
| a    |      |
| a    |      |
| b    |      |
| b    |      |
| c    |      |
| d    |      |
| a    |      |
| b    |      | 
+------+------+

I want the column "num" displays an incremental counter for each duplicate entry:

+------+------+
| data | num  | 
+------+------+
| a    |    1 | 
| a    |    2 |
| a    |    3 |
| b    |    1 |
| b    |    2 |
| c    |    1 |
| d    |    1 |
| a    |    4 |
| b    |    3 | 
+------+------+

Is this possible to be done without any other scripting besides a mySQL query?

UPDATE:

extended question here

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with cursor it can be done i think –  xurca Sep 17 '12 at 16:43
    
the COUNT(), together with GROUP BY gives me the number of duplicate entries. However I can't find how to increment "on each" duplicate occurrence... –  kairos Sep 17 '12 at 16:51
    
Why not just sort by data? –  Kermit Sep 17 '12 at 16:52
    
How's that? if i just sort by data it gives me an increment that doesn't reset every time it finds a new entry.. right? it will just display: a - 1, a - 2, a - 3, a - 4, b - 5, b - 6... –  kairos Sep 17 '12 at 16:55

4 Answers 4

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Unfortunately, MySQL does not have windowing functions which is what you will need. So you will have to use something like this:

Final Query

select data, group_row_number, overall_row_num
from
(
  select data,
        @num := if(@data = `data`, @num + 1, 1) as group_row_number,
        @data := `data` as dummy, overall_row_num
  from
  (
    select data, @rn:=@rn+1 overall_row_num
    from yourtable, (SELECT @rn:=0) r
  ) x
  order by data, overall_row_num
) x
order by overall_row_num

see SQL Fiddle with Demo

Explanation:

First, inner select, this applies a mock row_number to all of the records in your table (See SQL Fiddle with Demo):

select data, @rn:=@rn+1 overall_row_num
from yourtable, (SELECT @rn:=0) r

Second part of the query, compares each row in your table to the next one to see if it has the same value, if it doesn't then start the group_row_number over (see SQL Fiddle with Demo):

select data,
      @num := if(@data = `data`, @num + 1, 1) as group_row_number,
      @data := `data` as dummy, overall_row_num
from
(
  select data, @rn:=@rn+1 overall_row_num
  from yourtable, (SELECT @rn:=0) r
) x
order by data, overall_row_num

The last select, returns the values you want and places them back in the order you requested:

select data, group_row_number, overall_row_num
from
(
  select data,
        @num := if(@data = `data`, @num + 1, 1) as group_row_number,
        @data := `data` as dummy, overall_row_num
  from
  (
    select data, @rn:=@rn+1 overall_row_num
    from yourtable, (SELECT @rn:=0) r
  ) x
  order by data, overall_row_num
) x
order by overall_row_num
share|improve this answer
1  
Just to add some texture :) to this excellent answer, image that I've another column with an ID (incremental). Now I want to update my "num" column to be a concat between the letters on "data" and the counter you propose, such as "num" data would be: aa1, aa2, aa3, bb1, bb2, .. Anyway, SOOO MANY THKS! You already saved my day (or week, or month). In the meanwhile I'll try to update my table by myself... –  kairos Sep 17 '12 at 18:21
    
@kairos happy to help, my suggestion is if you have additional questions, then post a new one for help. :) If this answer helped you, then be sure to mark is as accepted via the checkmark on the left. –  bluefeet Sep 17 '12 at 18:26
    
+1 This would be easier with proper ROW_NUMBER() support. I recommend initializing @rn before executing the query, otherwise, especially as queries evolve over time, one can encounter obscure, unpleasant behavior with the initialization of user variables like this. –  pilcrow Sep 17 '12 at 18:52
    
@pilcrow I agree that proper row_number() support would be so much easier for these types of queries. –  bluefeet Sep 17 '12 at 18:53
    
I tried this code on many MySQL versions, and many clients, I keep getting group_row_number = 1 for every row, I applied the same schema and the same dataset. –  KraneBird Feb 24 '14 at 9:15

Here is a simple query that will do what you want.

select id,data,rownum 
  from (
          select id,
                 data,
                 @row:=if(@prev=data,@row,0) + 1 as rownum,
                 @prev:=data 
            from tbl
        order by data,id
)t

I have included an id on each row. But you don't need it.

Go fiddle: http://sqlfiddle.com/#!2/1d1f3/11/0

Credit: Want Row Number on Group of column in MY SQL?

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Does the data have to stay in the order shown, or can we sort by the 'data' value?

If you can sort, then you only have to keep track of the current 'data' value, which can be done with variables:

set @last_data = null;
set @count = 0;
select data, @count,
  case when @last_data is null or data != @last_data then @count := 1 else @count := @count + 1 end as new_count,
  @last_data := data, @count
from t20120917
order by data;

If not, I think it'll be more complex...

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it is something like this, but you will need to create procedure

create procedure procname()
begin
DECLARE done,i,j int DEFAULT 0;
DECLARE n,m nvarchar(500) DEFAULT '';

DECLARE cur CURSOR FOR SELECT d.data,d.num FROM tablename AS d ORDER BY DATA;
DECLARE CONTINUE HANDLER FOR NOT FOUND SET done = 1;


OPEN cur;

read_loop: LOOP

set m = n;
SET j = i;
fetch cur into n,i;

IF n = m 
THEN
SET i = i+1;
// UPDATE here your TABLE but you will need one more colomn to be able to UPDATE ONLY one RAW that you need
ELSE 
SET i = 0; //RESET indexer 
END IF;

IF done = 1 THEN
LEAVE read_loop;
END IF;

END LOOP read_loop;

CLOSE cur;
end
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