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I have a Django app that has a number of different models, all with a bunch of common data. Ultimately, I think this question comes down to a decision between inheritance and composition. My current implementation is something like this:

class Thing(models.Model):
    foo = models.FooField()
    bar = models.BarField()
    type = models.CharField()

class A(CommonStuff):
    aFoo = models.FooField()

class B(CommonStuff):
    bFoo = models.FooField()

With this model, I'm able to query for a Thing using the Thing model's manager. Using the type field on Thing, I can get the child object data by looking at the type field, which contains either 'a' or 'b', and then asking for (i.e.) thing.a.aFoo. This is a feature I like because it's a fairly common operation in my app to get a list of all Thing objects.

I see a couple couple issues here. First, the type field seems unnecessary. Is there way to get at the child data without having to first look up the type? It seems like I could work around this with an instance method that returned the correct object given its type value, or if I really wanted to get rid of the type field, I could iterate over each of the reverse relation fields on Thing, looking for one that doesn't raise a DoesNotExist exception. This feels quite brittle to me though. If I add a new 'subthing' C, I have to update Thing to look for the new type. I could fix this by making Thing and abstract model. That way, A and B get all the fields of Thing and I avoid having to use the type field. Problem, though, is that I lose the ability to perform queries for all Thing objects.

Another model I'm thinking about sort of flips this one on its head by turning the data in Thing into a field on A and B.

class Thing(models.Model):
    foo = models.FooField()
    bar = models.BarField()

class A(models.Model):
    aFoo = models.FooField()
    thing = models.OneToOneField(Thing)

class B(models.Model):
    bFoo = models.FooField()
    thing = models.OneToOneField(Thing)

This version has a few benefits. It gets rid of the type field on Thing, and—at least to me—looks and feels cleaner and less brittle. The problem here, though, is the same as the problem with making Thing abstract in the first version. I lose the ability to query all my 'subthings' together. I can do a query for A objects or a query for B objects, but not both. Can use this version of the model without having to sacrifice the ability to query for all 'subthings'? One possibility is to write a manager that queries both models and returns a QuerySet of all the objects. Does that work?

share|improve this question
    
The whole point of inheritance is the you can do things like for(Thing model in [Things]){ –  raam86 Sep 18 '12 at 9:38
    
I know. But I need a nice way of getting to the attributes of the child. Inheritance is not so great at that. –  erynofwales Sep 21 '12 at 3:14
    
are you looking to query on the subclasses from Thing.objects, or just be able to access the proper subclass from an instance of a Thing, or both? –  DMac the Destroyer Sep 21 '12 at 23:47
    
Mostly the latter, though I've spent a fair bit of time trying to write a Manager that will return instances of the subclasses. –  erynofwales Sep 25 '12 at 1:59
    
The QuerySet approach doesn't seem to be efficient. While I agree that the first solution is brittle, it is what I think the best option here. –  Kay Zhu Oct 10 '12 at 5:12

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