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Ive been searching a good simple sample for WF4 (or higher) state machine with resume (possibly BookMarks from the docs Ive read). I would like to see how can I implement a state machine that is able to resume at any given state inside a WF. Since I don't know anything about WF, I would like to see a simple state machine where I can resume the exceution at the state it was last time and it would also be nice to see how to 'force' a WF to jump to a state and re-start from there (if possible). Thansk a lot.

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You need implement a custom activity like this:

public sealed class WaitForBookmark : NativeActivity
{
    [RequiredArgument]
    public InArgument<String> BookmarkName { get; set; }

    protected override void Execute(NativeActivityContext context)
    {
        context.CreateBookmark(BookmarkName.Get(context));
    }

    protected override bool CanInduceIdle
    {
        get { return true; }
    }
}

Put this activity inside a state. After you need to Resume each bookmark.

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Try Pro WF 4.5 book's Chap. 4 State Machine examples. Even if you don't have the book, you can download the example source code from the Apress' book site.

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A state machine that jumps/skips certain states based upon data passed in when resuming a bookmark sounds like it is really just a State machine with conditional transitions.

Your transitions can be as complex as you want, they could be a fully connected graph if you were so inclined (which it sounds like you're asking for). But if you have many states this could become a nightmare very quickly with all the transitions & transition conditions that you might need.

Before you do anything like that you may want to take a look at Microsoft's How to Choose Your Workflow Model in WF and maybe carefully consider what you should model as a State and what might just be suited to be a Variable.


To answer your question of how to do this:

Building off of the MSDN example on building a bookmark activity you can accept the Resume argument as a string or object that contains the information you need to decide where to go in your transition.

public sealed class StateSelectorActivity : NativeActivity
{
    // Define an activity input argument of type string
    [RequiredArgument]
    public InArgument<string> BookmarkName { get; set; }
    public OutArgument<string> NextState { get; set; }

    protected override void Execute(NativeActivityContext context)
    {
        context.CreateBookmark(BookmarkName.Get(context), new BookmarkCallback(OnResumeBookmark));
    }

    protected override bool CanInduceIdle { get { return true; } }

    public void OnResumeBookmark(NativeActivityContext context, Bookmark bookmark, object obj)
    {
        StateSelectorArguments args = obj as StateSelectorArguments;
        if (args != null)
        {
            this.NextState.Set(context, args.NextState);
        }
    }
}

public class StateSelectorArguments
{
    public string NextState { get; set; }
    // ... Whatever else you want to pass in
}

So a StateMachine workflow that can goto any state at any time might have an InitialState that uses an input Argument to tell it which "StartState" to goto.

Then each intermediate state could have a single transition with the Trigger as the above activity, set a "NextState" local variable which the transition conditions can use to determine which state to goto next.

An extreme example of something using a StateMachine this way might be: If you have a StateMachine "ChessBoard" and an Instance called "White Queen" that has a current State of "e4" your Resume Bookmark call may take an argument "e5" and accept that to move "White Queen" to State "e5".

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