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Whenever I build the following code, I get the error above.

//Controller.h
#import <UIKit/UIKit.h>
#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>
#import "PolygonShape.h"
#import "PolygonView.h";

@interface Controller : NSObject
{
    IBOutlet UIButton *decreaseButton;
    IBOutlet UIButton *increaseButton;
    IBOutlet UILabel *numberOfSidesLabel;
    IBOutlet PolygonShape *shape;
    IBOutlet PolygonView *shapeView;
}
- (IBAction)decrease;
- (IBAction)increase;
- (void)awakeFromNib;
@end


//Controller.m
#import "Controller.h"


@implementation Controller
@end

However, when I replace the import statement and put a forward class reference instead, the code compiles.

//Controller.h

#import <UIKit/UIKit.h>
#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>
#import "PolygonShape.h"
@class PolygonView;

@interface Controller : NSObject
{
    IBOutlet UIButton *decreaseButton;
    IBOutlet UIButton *increaseButton;
    IBOutlet UILabel *numberOfSidesLabel;
    IBOutlet PolygonShape *shape;
    IBOutlet PolygonView *shapeView;
}
- (IBAction)decrease;
- (IBAction)increase;
- (void)awakeFromNib;
@end

//Controller.m
#import "Controller.h"
#import "PolygonView.h"

@implementation Controller
@end

Can anyone explain?

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5  
PolygonShape and PolygonView probably have cyclical imports. That's why forward declarations exist. Use them, please. –  Jason Coco Aug 7 '09 at 19:19
    
PolygonShape and PolygonView didn't have cyclical imports, but PolygonView and Controller did. Thanks for the help! –  Ridwan Aug 7 '09 at 19:25
2  
@Jason: That would probably make a good answer. –  Chuck Aug 7 '09 at 19:25
4  
@Chuck, no it would not. It would be the beginning of a very good answer. The end is where you have to explain what a forward declaration is, and WHY YOU USE IT FOR AVOID CYCLIC DECLARATIONS, which for those of us coming from Java makes no sense at all. @Jason Coco, if you write that answer you'll get upvoted for years to come (and help me understand this gnarly subject). –  Yar Feb 28 '10 at 0:58
    
+1 for a good example for cyclic dependencies in header files. –  Nick Weaver May 1 '11 at 15:29

9 Answers 9

up vote 24 down vote accepted

Yes, I too had this problem of Cyclical Dependencies where I was importing both classes in each other. I also didn't know what Forward Declarations were. I promptly searched it on Wikipedia but it was poorly described. I found this post that explains what they are and how they relate to cyclical imports. http://timburrell.net/blog/2008-11-23/effective-c-cyclical-dependencies/

Note: The link keeps going down so I just PDF'd it. http://dl.dropbox.com/u/955/archive/Effective-Cpp-Cyclical-Dependencies.pdf

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This happens because you forgot to include one of the header files. I was also getting the same kind of error, but after proper inclusion of the header file the error went away.

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I got this error with a simple mistake... perhaps others are doing likewise?

CORRECT:

@interface ButtonDevice : NSObject 

{

    NSString *name;
    NSString *uri;
    NSString *icon;
}

    @property (nonatomic, retain) IBOutlet NSString *name;
    @property (nonatomic, retain) IBOutlet NSString *uri;
    @property (nonatomic, retain) IBOutlet NSString *icon;
@end

WRONG:

@interface ButtonDevice : NSObject 
{

    NSString *name;
    NSString *uri;
    NSString *icon;

    @property (nonatomic, retain) IBOutlet NSString *name;
    @property (nonatomic, retain) IBOutlet NSString *uri;
    @property (nonatomic, retain) IBOutlet NSString *icon;
}   
@end
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How are these two different? I don't see it. –  JJ Rohrer Oct 7 '11 at 13:27
    
bracket before the property vs after –  LordFire Oct 12 '11 at 11:14
    
useless..it's the same to write "You should type @implementation BEFORE the @end" it's just evident that you should only put class variables in curly braces –  Stas Apr 10 '12 at 8:15

Just has to include a class which seemed to be overlooked:

#import "NameOfClass.h"

and it was sorted. Thanks.

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You can also check for dumb spelling mistakes. For example, I had a class called 'MyUIViewController' but I wrote:

@property (nonatomic, retain) MyViewController *myViewController; 

And got this error. After I corrected it to:

@property (nonatomic, retain) MyUIViewController *myViewController; 

The error was fixed, computers are so literal.

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I just had this issue in an Objective-C++ project - in that case, it's one of the errors that can crop up if you forget to name your implementation file .mm instead of .m.

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Just follow this rule to avoid such problems:

If an object is only used internally by class's implementation file, use forward declaration in the header file and import/include in the implementation file. Otherwise use import in the header.

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Reference, please? –  Madbreaks Dec 12 '12 at 21:46

If you deleted the Precompiled Prefix Header you must manually import the header-files needed into the the file:

like

#import <UIKit/UIKit.h>
#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>
#import <CoreData/CoreData.h>
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I ran into this error when trying to reference a protocol I had set up myself.

This shows my protocol, the wrong method, and what I think is right method.

in .h
// ------------------------------------ EtEmailDelegate Protocol -BEGIN- --------------------------------------
@protocol EtEmailDelegate
    - (void)mailComposeController:(MFMailComposeViewController *)controller didFinishWithResult:(MFMailComposeResult)result error:(NSError *)error; //<-- This is really just one chunk from the MFMailComposeViewControllerDelegate
@end
// ------------------------------------ EtEmailDelegate Protocol -END- --------------------------------------


@interface ClsEtEmail : NSObject < MFMailComposeViewControllerDelegate>  {
    // owner
    UIViewController *myUivc;
    //EtEmailDelegate *myDelegate; // <--- the wrong way, throw error
    id<EtEmailDelegate>  *myDelegate; // <-- the right way (i think)
    ...
  }
  @property (nonatomic, readwrite, assign) id<EtEmailDelegate>  delegate;
@end

Just for completeness, here is how I'm implementing some methods that also rely on the protocol...

in .m
@synthesize delegate = myDelegate;

// my static initializer
+(id) objEtEmailWithUivc: (UIViewController*) theUivc delegate: (id <EtEmailDelegate>) theDelegate {
  ClsEtEmail * obj = [[[ClsEtEmail alloc] initWithlUivc: theUivc delegate:theDelegate] autorelease];      
  return obj;
}


// my normal init
- (id)initWithlUivc: (UIViewController*) theUivc delegate: (id <EtEmailDelegate>) theDelegate {
  self = [super init];
  if (self) {
    [self init_]; // my private init (not seen)
    self.uivc = theUivc; 
    NSAssert([theDelegate conformsToProtocol:@protocol(EtEmailDelegate)],@"whoh - this can't is notE tEmailDelegate");
    self.delegate = theDelegate;
  }
  return self;
}

Hope this helps someone else.

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