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From within a C++/CX XAML application, how and when do I get information from the XAML layout engine to know where a particular control or grid position ended up, so that I can target my rendering to a SwapChainBackgroundPanel to specifically that area?

After immediately creating a page, and assigning it to the Current::Window->Content of the Application, I'm assuming I'll need to wait for some sort of layout pass to call me back, etc.. Then, once that happens, where can I find the final layout positions (in Window-relative pixel coordinates) of grid positions, or any placeholder XAML element?

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

This should work once your descendant control raises the Loaded event (needs translation from C# to C++/CX):

Rect descendantControlBoundsInWindowCoordinateSpace = DescendantControl
    .TransformToVisual(Window.Current.Content)
    .TransformBounds(
        new Rect(
            0,
            0,
            DescendantControl.ActualWidth,
            DescendantControl.ActualHeight))
share|improve this answer
    
By "DescendantControl", are you saying my Page class should add a listener to the "Loaded" event on the placeholder control? Or, to put it another way, can I be guaranteed that the XAML has been laid out at the point that Loaded is fired? The docs say, "Occurs when Silverlight content is loaded into the host Silverlight plug-in and XAML is parsed, but before the content is rendered" which is ambiguous about layout... – Will Bradley Sep 17 '12 at 21:29
    
Your Page instance IS a descendant control of Window.Current.Content. Once Page.Loaded is fired - the first layout pass should have updated the positions of the components on screen, so you can pass the calculated positions or bounds to your DirectX compositor. – Filip Skakun Sep 17 '12 at 21:45

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