Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a code: Demo jsFiddle

which loop three times, each time creating a new function that returns the loop sequence number.

I expected to see the loop sequence inser to array : 0, 1, and 2.

a[i] = function() {
            return i;
        }

everything looks normal but when I try to print the array I got

the resualt:

arr[0] is =>function () { return i; }
arr[1] is =>function () { return i; }
arr[2] is =>function () { return i; }

the code:

function f() {
    var a = [];
    var i;
    for (i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
        a[i] = function() {
            return i;
        }
    }
    return a;
}
var arr = f();

for (var index = 0; index < arr.length; index++) {
    document.write("<b>arr[" + index + "] is </b>=>" + arr[index] + "<br>");
}​

why I don't get the resualt 0, 1, and 2. ?

many thx.

share|improve this question
    
Because the variable "i" - which all the functions share - is just a single variable, and using it in those functions does not "freeze" its value. Each function will return the value of "i" as it stands when the function call is made, not what it was when the function was created. – Pointy Sep 17 '12 at 18:50
3  
Why not : a[i]=i ? – fmgp Sep 17 '12 at 18:52
    
Demo jsfidle I try it – yossi Sep 17 '12 at 18:57
    
Corrections to your fiddle: jsfiddle.net/GEnPf/13 – techfoobar Sep 17 '12 at 18:59
    
Ok thanks........ – yossi Sep 17 '12 at 19:01
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Because a[i] is a function, not the returned value from the function. So basically you are filling your array with three function bodies, so when you retrieve any of them, you are getting back the body of the function. You can try to do a[i].call() to call the function returned but then you'd get 3 for each invocation, which in line with what Pointy has pointed out in the comment. Because that was the last value when the loop was called, i became 3 right before the loop stopped

See the fiddle

share|improve this answer

I think I understand why you expected all array elements to return the value i had at the time the function was constructed. Which isn't that big of a leap, but each and every of those functions share a single scope. The values aren't linked to the created functions, it's the scope that outlives the "mother" function. In this scope there is a single variable called i that is incremented until it's 3. The only thing you could do, if you really, really want to use a closure is this:

function f()
{
    var a = [];
    var i;
    for (i = 0; i < 3; i++)
    {
        a[i] = (function(currentI)
        {//create a separate scope, pass current value of i to it
            return function()
            {
                return currentI;
            }
        })(i);
    }
    return a;
}
var arr = f();
for (var index = 0; index < arr.length; index++)
{
    document.write("<b>arr[" + index + "] is </b>=>" + arr[index]() + "<br>");
}​

This produces the expected result, as you can see here

share|improve this answer

Just for the record, if you truly wanted an array with three functions where each returns values of i as they were at the time the function was created, you just need to pass in a copy of i when you assign your function to a[i]:

function f() {
    var a = [];
    var i;
    for (i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
        a[i] = (function(n) {
            return function() {
                return n;
            };
        }(i));
    }
    return a;
}

var arr = f();

for (var index = 0; index < arr.length; index++) {
    document.write("<b>arr[" + index + "]() is </b>=> " + arr[index]() + "<br>");
}​

Outputs:

arr[0]() is => 0
arr[1]() is => 1
arr[2]() is => 2

JSFiddle

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks alot........ – yossi Sep 17 '12 at 20:59

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.