Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'd like to do the following, in an abstract way:

// .h
@interface SomeObject : NSObject
@property (readonly) NSArray myProperty;
@end

// .m
@interface SomeObject ()
@property (readwrite) NSMutableArray myProperty;
@end

@implementation SomeObject
@end

According to the section Subclassing with Properties in the Mac Developer Library it is allowed to overwrite readonly properties with readwrite. What doesn't work is using a subclass for the property type. I used NSMutableArray as an example, but it could be any other class/subclass combination.

According to inheritance rules, it should be ok though. readonly just generates the getter which also is allowed to return a subclass object.

How do you tackle such cases when you need a subclass type for some property for internal use?

An ugly way would be the following, but I'd like to avoid that as it means that I cannot use the self. getters and setters when accessing subclass methods.

// .h
@interface SomeObject : NSObject
@property (readonly) NSArray myProperty;
@end

// .m
@implementation SomeObject {
    NSMutableArray _myProperty;
}
@synthesize myProperty = _myProperty;
@end
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

EDIT (based on your edits): Your specific case after the edit is a somewhat special and common case (if it can be both at the same time), and requires some careful consideration.

The reason this is a special is because the subclass is a mutable form of the exposed class. The caller may expect that it will not change after receiving it. But if you hand back your internal object, then it might mutate. You have several options:

  • Return an immutable copy. This is often the best solution for small collections. It's certainly the simplest. But if the accessor may be called often and the collection is large, it can be prohibitively expensive.

  • Make your internal property immutable. If requests for the property are much more common than changes to the property, it can be more efficient to recreate the object when it mutates (using arrayByAddingObject:, subarrayWithRange: and the like).

  • Warn the caller that the object being returned may change.... uggh... I've done this in one case where I needed the performance, but it's quite dangerous.

  • I've never actually done it this way, but you could also create your own copy-on-write this way: Return the mutable version directly and mark a flag that it is now "dirty." When mutation is required internally, make a mutable copy and store it in your property (letting go of the old collection). This seems a lot of complexity, but might be useful for some situations, particularly if reads and writes tend to clump separately (lots of reads followed by lots of writes).


OLD ANSWER based on NSObject vs. NSString:

I assume your goal here is to make myProperty be of some opaque type, rather than leaking the fact that it is an NSString? Perhaps so you can change your mind later on how it's actually implemented? There are a few options. The easiest is to define it of type id. Then internally just treat it as a string. id can be anything. It is usually preferred over NSObject*.

If you want more type-safety internally, then you can create a private property with another name of type NSString and return it for myProperty like this:

SomeObject.h

@interface SomeObject : NSObject
@property (readonly) id myProperty;
@end

SomeObject.m

@interface SomeObject ()
@property (readwrite) NSString *myInternalProperty;
@end

@implementation SomeObject
- (id)myProperty {
  return myInternalProperty;
}
@end

Another hiding technique you can use (if hiding is very important to you) is a subclass. For example:

SomeObject.h

@class MyOpaque;
@interface SomeObject : NSObject
@property (readonly) MyOpaque *myProperty;
@end

SomeObject.m

@interface MyOpaque : NSString
@end
@implementation MyOpaque
@end

@implementation SomeObject
@end

Since the caller does not have an @interface definition for MyOpaque, he can't send messages to it without a compiler warning.

share|improve this answer
    
For my purposes, the "private property with another name" variant would be the only interesting one. The caller should be able to send messages according to the exposed type, but not for the subtype. I updated my question to reflect that a little better. –  fabb Sep 17 '12 at 20:54
    
We're using your 3rd way at the moment, as we have a big array which changes often. But back to properties, how would you use the property internally in this way? Do you think the "private property with another name" would be the best shot here? –  fabb Sep 18 '12 at 6:02
    
BTW while mutable classes being subclasses of nonmutables has proven to be very practical, it stumped me. It's actually not following inheritance rules. The subclass would have to follow the same invariants as its parent class, which would be that its objects don't change. But in the iOS world, often a mutable version is returned where a nonmutable is expected. Problems arise when the returning object alters the mutable object after returning like you described. –  fabb Sep 18 '12 at 6:08

How do you tackle such cases when you need a subclass type for some property for internal use?

Properties are explicitly not for internal use, they are members of a public interface.

If you need an internal value define a member field and override the setter of the property to set your internal value.

share|improve this answer
5  
What do you mean by "properties are explicitly not for internal use?" Properties are often for internal use. It is very common to place them in private class extensions. They are only public if put in the public interface. That isn't required. –  Rob Napier Sep 17 '12 at 19:41
4  
It is very common (and highly recommended by many of us, including Apple) to use private properties for this. You shouldn't directly access your ivars except in init, dealloc, and inside of custom accessors. –  Rob Napier Sep 17 '12 at 19:44
3  
@stackmonster: The idea that you wouldn't want accessors for private state is just weird. Accessors handle more than just setting a variable — they also ensure consistent memory management and enable KVO, and generally just improve the modularity of your code. I used accessors for private state long before declared properties were introduced, and I know a lot of others did too. The only logical reason to use raw ivar access outside of con/destructors and accessors is if you've profiled and found the accessors are slowing you down too much — otherwise accessors are pure win. –  Chuck Sep 17 '12 at 20:07
2  
I use private @properties all the time too. And I never ever use ivars anymore (since a long time now). And Apple does and recommand this too. And it is way better, as it enforces good memory mgmt by calling the setters (even internally). @properties have never been reduced to be used into the public interface. See gist.github.com/3739465 for a simple example. PS : Personally I even put my IBOutlet and IBAction in the .m file to avoid them being exposed in my public API. –  AliSoftware Sep 17 '12 at 20:09
3  
The fact is that properties wouldn't exist except to expose state publicly, and it doesn't matter if the people who invented them disagree with you? You have an interesting way of looking at the world. Apparently you know why they made properties better than they do. –  Chuck Sep 17 '12 at 20:31

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.