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I need to match a string which second letter is "a", my current regex is: ^([^a-zA-Z]*[a-zA-Z][^a-zA-Z]*)a+ but this matches less than I need, I dont even know what It doesnt match but do you know where is the problem, or if there is a better way of doing this? For example I need to match these:

"  kamcnn"
",.,ya..--/**+-00"
"0        0   q    a"

I match every string that I can imagine but Im still getting lower results than I should get. EDIT: By "letter" I mean a character from [a-zA-Z] class.

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1  
Not sure what you mean by "second letter is a"... From the strings you've provided it seems like you're just looking for 'a' to exist somewhere in the string. – James Sep 17 '12 at 19:08
    
Looks okay to me, perhaps you need to match uppercase as well? If so, use ^([^a-zA-Z]*[a-zA-Z][^a-zA-Z]*)[aA] – Andrew Clark Sep 17 '12 at 19:10
    
Hmm, no, tested it, same results. I found 23389 lines, but I should have found 26639. – TehKing Sep 17 '12 at 19:15
    
In the example you gave, what does your regex miss? – John Dewey Sep 17 '12 at 19:21
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Try this:

^[^a-zA-Z]*[a-zA-Z][^a-zA-Z]*a.*

This matches the entire string if the second ASCII letter is a:

^           # Start of string
[^a-zA-Z]*  # Match any number of non-letters
[a-zA-Z]    # Match one ASCII letter
[^a-zA-Z]*  # Match any number of non-letters
a           # Match an a
.*          # Match whatever follows
share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, no, tested it, same results. I found 23389 lines, but I should have found 26639. – TehKing Sep 17 '12 at 19:14
1  
Show one of the lines that didn't match but should have. – Tim Pietzcker Sep 17 '12 at 19:19

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