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Is it bad form to exit() from within function?

def respond_OK():
    sys.stdout.write('action=OK\n\n')
    sys.stdout.flush() # redundant when followed by exit()
    sys.exit(0)

Rather than setting an exit code and exit()ing from the __main__ name space?

def respond_OK():
    global exit_status
    sys.stdout.write('action=OK\n\n')
    sys.stdout.flush()
    exit_status = 0

sys.exit(exit_status)

The difference is negligible from a function perspective, just wondered what the consensus is on form. If you found the prior in someone else's code, would you look at it twice?

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4  
Pretty subjective question. In a small enough application (simple script, for example) I probably wouldn't care. Putting it into a large program, however, I would get worried having exits all over the place. Of course, this just asks the question of "What is a large program"? One subjective question deserves another, I guess :P –  Mark Hildreth Sep 17 '12 at 19:08
    
I wouldn't see why it would be bad form to call exit() from anywhere as for calling any other function. –  user1019830 Sep 17 '12 at 19:08
3  
What's bad is this: globals()['exit_status'] = 0 Eww. –  FogleBird Sep 17 '12 at 19:09
    
@FogleBird Like that better? :p –  tMC Sep 17 '12 at 19:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I would prefer to see an exception raised and handled from a main entry point, the type of which is translated into the exit code. Subclassing exceptions is so simple in python it's almost fun.

As posted in this answer's comments: Using sys.exit also means that the point of termination needs to know the actual status code, as opposed to the kind of error it encountered. Though that could be solved by an set of constants, of course. Using exceptions has other advantages, though: if one method fails, you could try another without re-entry, or print some post-mortem debugging info.

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1  
That's exactly what sys.exit does. It raises SystemExit which can be caught or not. The nice thing is that it doesn't print an ugly traceback if you choose to let the interpretter exit at that point. –  mgilson Sep 17 '12 at 19:22
1  
Yes, but then the point of termination needs to know the actual status code, as opposed to the kind of error it encountered. Though that could be solved by an set of constants, of course. Using exceptions has other advantages, though: if one method fails, you could try another without re-entry, or print some post-mortem debugging info. –  sapht Sep 17 '12 at 19:27
    
@sapht Add that to your answer. –  Marcin Sep 17 '12 at 19:36

It makes no difference in terms of functionality, but it will likely make your code harder to follow, unless you take appropriate steps, e.g. commenting each of the calls from the main namespace which could lead to an exit.

Update: Note @mgilson's answer re the effect of catching an exception [It is possible to catch the exception that system.exit raises, and thus prevent exit]. You could make your code even more confusing that way.

Update 2: Note @sapht's suggestion to use an exception to orchestrate an exit. This is good advice, if you really want to do a non-local exit. Much better than setting a global.

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There are a few cases where it's reasonably idiomatic.

If the user gives you bad command-line arguments, instead of this:

def usage(arg0):
  print ... % (arg0,)
  return 2

if __name__ == '__main__':
  if ...:
    sys.exit(usage(sys.argv[0]))

You often see this:

def usage():
  print ... % (sys.argv[0],)
  sys.exit(2)

if __name__ == '__main__':
  if ...:
    usage()

The only other common case I can think of is where initializing some library (via ctypes or a low-level C extension module) fails unexpectedly and leaves you in a state you can't reason about, so you just want to get out as soon as possible (e.g., to reduce the chance of segfaulting or printing garbage) For example:

if libfoo.initialize() != 0:
  sys.exit(1)

Some might object to that because sys.exit doesn't actually bail out of the interpreter as soon as possible (it throws and catches an exception), so it's a false sense of safety. But you still see it reasonably often.

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