Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Code first. This is what I'm trying to do. I'm close, but I think I just need to fix the way I've defined my parameter in the UpdateButton method.

private async void UpdateButton(Action<bool> post)
{
    if (!await post())
        ErrorBox.Text = "Error posting message.";
}

private void PostToTwitter()
{
    UpdateButton(async () => await new TwitterAction().Post("Hello, world!"));
}

private void PostToFacebook()
{
    UpdateButton(async () => await new FacebookAction().Post("Hello, world!"));
}

Unfortunately, the !await post() doesn't work because, "Type 'void' is not awaitable." So the question is, how do I define my parameter in this method to support an awaitable parameter?

Here's how the TwitterAction().Post() is defined...

public virtual async Task<bool> Post(string messageId){...}

share|improve this question
    
Please show your TwitterAction.Post method syntax, so we can show how to rework it appropriately. –  Reed Copsey Sep 17 '12 at 19:46
    
An Action<bool> requires a boolean parameter, but you aren't supplying one. Where does the parameter come from? –  Servy Sep 17 '12 at 19:47
    
@Reed, I added the method definition for you. Thanks. –  mrjedmao Sep 17 '12 at 19:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted
private async void UpdateButton(Func<Task<bool>> post)
{
    if (!await post())
        ErrorBox.Text = "Error posting message.";
}

--EDIT--

UpdateButton(()=>Post("ss"));

private async void UpdateButton(Func<Task<bool>> post)
{
    if (!await post())
        this.Text = "Error posting message.";
}

public virtual async Task<bool> Post(string messageId)
{
    return await Task.Factory.StartNew(() => true);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Type 'System.Func<System.Threading.Tasks.Task<bool>>' is not awaitable. –  mrjedmao Sep 17 '12 at 19:49
    
@sfjedi On the other hand, i don't get any compilation error in VS2012. –  L.B Sep 17 '12 at 19:51
    
I'm trying to keep it simple. This does not compile. The only difference I can think of is that it's a WinRT project. –  mrjedmao Sep 17 '12 at 19:59
    
@sfjedi That's all I can think of with the info you provided. –  L.B Sep 17 '12 at 20:06
1  
Ahh, it was my mistake, of course. I forgot to put the () back in there from when I was trying @Reed's example. Great answer! Thanks. –  mrjedmao Sep 17 '12 at 21:04

You need to pass this as a Task<bool>, not an Action<bool>.

This provides something that's "awaitable".

I believe this will work, given your current code:

private async Task UpdateButtonAsync(Task<bool> post)
{
    if (!await post)
        ErrorBox.Text = "Error posting message.";
}

// This will work if Post returns Task<bool> in the current API...
private void PostToTwitter()
{
    UpdateButtonAsync(new TwitterAction().Post("Hello, world!"));
}

If you do not want to start the Task<bool> immediately, and need to keep it as passing a lambda, there is still no reason for the lambda to be async. In that case, you could use:

private async Task UpdateButtonAsync(Func<Task<bool>> post)
{
    if (!await post())
        ErrorBox.Text = "Error posting message.";
}

// This will work if Post returns Task<bool> in the current API...
private void PostToTwitter()
{
    UpdateButtonAsync(() => new TwitterAction().Post("Hello, world!"));
}

This causes the lambda to return the Task<bool> (no async/await required, as Post already returns Task<bool>), and the update method to run the lambda.

Personally, I find the first option (above) simpler, and suspect it is more likely what you want. Given your API already returns Task<T>, you can just pass that around and await it directly.

share|improve this answer
    
Then I get a different error, "Method, delegate or event is expected." –  mrjedmao Sep 17 '12 at 19:45
    
@sfjedi Can you include your current declaration of the "Post" method? How is it currently defined? –  Reed Copsey Sep 17 '12 at 19:46
    
@sfjedi My current edit should work, given your last edit... There is no need for a lambda here. –  Reed Copsey Sep 17 '12 at 19:53
    
This is not the same thing. The Task is already started whereas the Action can be invoked at any time. See answer by L.B –  usr Sep 17 '12 at 19:57
    
@usr Except that, the way this works, the action is being called immediately. There isn't any advantage in this scenario of adding the extra complexity, if the goal is just to check the results. It just makes the entire thing more complex but provides no advantages of using a hot task (which is more standard) –  Reed Copsey Sep 17 '12 at 19:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.