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import re

stri = "Hello guys.\nHow are you doing?\nI hope you have sweet dreams tonight."
regex = re.compile("guys[.\n]*$")

print regex.findall(stri)

I know . in regex can be any character except a newline, [xy] means either x or y, * after a character means any number of that character and $ denotes the end of the string. So why does "guys[.\n]*$" not give me "guys.\nHow are you doing?\nI hope you have sweet dreams tonight."?

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1  
By the way, if you use the flag re.DOTALL then the dot will match newlines also(and you can avoid using the character class at all). –  Bakuriu Sep 17 '12 at 20:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You put the period in a character class, where it is the one place it will just match a . character and nothing else. [...] means any literal character contained in that class.

You want to use the re.DOTALL configuration constant instead:

regex = re.compile("guys.*$", re.DOTALL)

Alternatively, you should keep the . outside of the character class and use it in a group with the \n newline:

regex = re.compile("guys(?:.|\n)*$")

Demo:

>>> import re
>>> stri = "Hello guys.\nHow are you doing?\nI hope you have sweet dreams tonight."
>>> regex = re.compile("guys.*$", re.DOTALL)
>>> print regex.findall(stri)
['guys.\nHow are you doing?\nI hope you have sweet dreams tonight.']
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Martijn's answer gives a good explanation for the behavior you are seeing. As an alternative to the re.DOTALL or (?:.\n) option, you can use something like the following:

regex = re.compile(r"guys[\s\S]*$")

Since \s means "all whitespace" and \S means "anything but whitespace", putting them in a character class together will allow to match any character including newlines.

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use re.MULLTILINE and you should match over lines...

>>> regex = re.compile("guys.*",re.DOTALL|re.MULTILINE)
>>> regex.findall(stri)
['guys.\nHow are you doing?\nI hope you have sweet dreams tonight.']

/EDIT :As martjin points out I am wrong about multi-line

>>> regex = re.compile("guys.*",re.DOTALL)
>>> regex.findall(stri)
['guys.\nHow are you doing?\nI hope you have sweet dreams tonight.']
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1  
re.MULTILINE only applies to where the ^ and $ start and end anchors attach to. –  Martijn Pieters Sep 17 '12 at 20:26
    
yeah ok ... Ive been using that wrong for a while (thanks for that :) always like learning something new –  Joran Beasley Sep 17 '12 at 20:28

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