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Can I use a prepared statement in Postgres to add multiple values? When I saw that things are added to the prepared statement with array($val), it sort of occurred to me that I should be able to supply an array of values to be put in my table. Is this wildly incorrect? When I tried, I saw in my db table only Array. I don't know if it is an actual array, but I'm guessing, just the word, as the column is a simple character variable.

$tag    =  array('item1', 'item2', 'item3');

// Prepare a query for execution
$result = pg_prepare($dbconn, "my_query", "INSERT INTO $table ($column) VALUES ($1)");

// Execute the prepared query.  Note that it is not necessary to escape
// the string "Joe's Widgets" in any way
$result = pg_execute($dbconn, "my_query", array("$tag"));

Otherwise, why is the one value supplied as an array?

share|improve this question
    
the value is supplied as an array in order to satisfy all possible variables in your prepared stmt. your case is only confusing because your prepared query only needs one. consider the case "INSERT INTO my_table (a, b, c, d) values ($1, $2, $3, $4);" –  David Chan Sep 25 at 2:48

2 Answers 2

No it's not, You inserted the text Array... if the type of $column is text your code should read

$tag    =  array('item1', 'item2', 'item3');

// Prepare a query for execution
$result = pg_prepare($dbconn, "my_query", "INSERT INTO $table ($column) VALUES ($1)");

// Execute the prepared query.  Note that it is not necessary to escape
// the string "Joe's Widgets" in any way
foreach( $tag as $i )
    $result = pg_execute($dbconn, "my_query", array($i));
/// alternatively you could try this if you really wanna insert a text as array of text without using text[] type - uncomment line below and comment the 2 above
// $result = pg_execute($dbconn, "my_query", array(json_encode($tag)));

or if you defined $column as text[] which is legal in postgresql as array the code should read

$tag    =  array('item1', 'item2', 'item3');

// Prepare a query for execution
$result = pg_prepare($dbconn, "my_query", "INSERT INTO $table ($column) VALUES ($1)");

// Execute the prepared query.  Note that it is not necessary to escape
// the string "Joe's Widgets" in any way
$tmp = json_encode($tag);
$tmp[0] = '{';
$tmp[strlen($tmp) - 1] = '}';
$result = pg_execute($dbconn, "my_query", array($tmp));
share|improve this answer
1  
i get this error: Warning: pg_execute() expects parameter 3 to be array, string given –  thomas Sep 17 '12 at 20:58
    
Try it now, sorry, I didn't test the code, tried to be helpful as fast as possible. –  xception Sep 17 '12 at 21:05
    
one of the 3 versions I gave you should suit your needs, postgresql is very smart I suggest the one where you use text[] as type and insert accordingly (the last one) - should be suitable for most needs –  xception Sep 17 '12 at 21:24

You can try to serialize it:

$tag = array('item1', 'item2', 'item3');
$tag = serialize($tag);
// Prepare a query for execution
$result = pg_prepare($dbconn, "my_query", "INSERT INTO $table ($column) VALUES ($1)");

// Execute the prepared query.  Note that it is not necessary to escape
// the string "Joe's Widgets" in any way
$result = pg_execute($dbconn, "my_query", $tag);

Then when you want to get it from the DB as a PHP array, unserialize it.

share|improve this answer
    
that gave me an object in my record that looked like this a:3:{i:0;s:5:"item1";i:1;s:5:"item2";i:2;s:5:"item3";} –  thomas Sep 17 '12 at 20:50
    
That's right, now to turn it back to a PHP array you have to use unserialize($yourarray); –  AdamGold Sep 17 '12 at 20:50
    
but it started as a php array... i don't understand.. –  thomas Sep 17 '12 at 20:53
    
The serialize function is useful for storing or passing PHP values around without losing their type and structure. So for saving your array in the database, you would want to use that and then unserialize it to get the original array. –  AdamGold Sep 17 '12 at 20:56
    
However, it makes it very complex to write queries if you want to use these values in where or order by clauses. –  xception Sep 17 '12 at 21:12

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