Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Suppose there are N points in a 2-D graph.Each point has some weight attached to it.I am required to draw a straight line such a way that the line divides the points into 2 groups such that total weight(sum of weight of points in that group) of part with smaller weight be as many as possible.My task is to find this value.How to go about it ?

Note:No three points lie on the same line.

This is not a homework or part of any contest.

share|improve this question
    
By "2-graph" you mean that the points are connected by arcs, or that you have points defined by (X,Y) coordinates? Also, what is the order of magnitude of N? –  lserni Sep 17 '12 at 21:20
    
@lserni: points are defined by (X,Y) coordinates. –  g4ur4v Sep 18 '12 at 6:45
    
this is the link to the question interviewstreet.com/challenges/dashboard/#problem/50226d4812964 –  g4ur4v Sep 18 '12 at 7:33
    
The link doesn't work for me. –  Junuxx Sep 18 '12 at 10:58
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could just scan over all angles and offsets until you find the optimal solution.

For ease of computation, I would rotate all the points with a simple rotation matrix to align the points with the scanline, so that you only have to look at their x coordinates.

You only have to check half a circle before the scanline doubles up on itself, that's an angle of 0 to PI assuming that you're working with radians, not degrees. Also assuming that the points can be read from the data as some kind of objects with an x, y and weight value.

Pseudocode:

Initialize points from input data
Initialize bestDifference to sum(weights of points)
Initialize bestAngle to 0
Initialize bestOffset to 0
Initialize angleStepSize to an arbitrary small value (e.g. PI/100)

For angle = 0:angleStepSize:PI
    Initialize rotatedpoints from points and rotationMatrix(angle)

    For offset = (lowest x in rotatedpoints) to (highest x in rotatedpoints)
        weightsLeft = sum of the weights of all nodes with x < offset
        weightsRight = sum of the weights of all nodes with x > offset
        difference = abs(weightsLeft - weightsRight)
        If difference < bestDifference 
            bestAngle = angle
            bestOffset = offset
            bestDifference = difference

    Increment angle by stepsize
Return bestAngle, bestOffset, bestDifference

Here's a crude Paint image to clarify my approach:

2dgraph image

share|improve this answer
    
Could you please elaborate on For ease of computation, I would rotate all the points with a simple rotation matrix to align the points with the scanline, so that you only have to look at their x coordinates. –  g4ur4v Sep 18 '12 at 7:35
    
and also ***For angle = 0:angleStepSize:PI Initialize rotatedpoints from points and rotationMatrix(angle)***How do you do this? Can you please share a link or page that would be helpful.I am a beginner in programming and doesn't have good idea about computational geometry. –  g4ur4v Sep 18 '12 at 7:39
    
this is the link to the question I am trying to solve interviewstreet.com/challenges/dashboard/#problem/50226d4812964 –  g4ur4v Sep 18 '12 at 7:41
    
@g4ur4v: I added an image that hopefully makes things clearer. I meant that checking whether a point is left or right of a line is easier for a vertical line than with any slanted line. Not that it's very hard of course, since you always have the function of the line, but I thought that transforming the points would be easier. For 0:angleStepSize:PI means that you have a loop variable that goes from 0 to Pi with increases of angleStepSize. So 0:3:12 is equivalent to 0,3,6,9,12. As for the point transformation, please check the link about rotation matrices I gave in the answer. –  Junuxx Sep 18 '12 at 9:23
1  
You are genius.I think this will definitely work.I'll get back to you once I am done with programming.Thanks a lot ! –  g4ur4v Sep 18 '12 at 15:05
show 2 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.