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I have a git repository for django code. Python version 2.6 and django version 1.4. Today accidentally from my home computer I tried to start the django app with python 2.7.3 and something strange happened. I have lost all the data from my data tables. I am not sure if the clash of versions is the cause or something else. How can I find out why the tables are empty? could it be a mysql problem? what would be the best strategy to debug this? The data is not that important but I would not like this to happen again.

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2 Answers 2

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How can I find out why the tables are empty? could it be a mysql problem? what would be the best strategy to debug this? The data is not that important but I would not like this to happen again.

The only way I can see short of thoroughly debugging the Django installation would be to set MySQL to logging everything, through the log facility in my.cnf:

[mysqld]
log            = /var/log/mysql/queries.log

then restoring the data, then restarting MySQL so that the logging is in effect, and attempting again with Python 2.7.4. The data should disappear again, but this time you'll see what commands where issued in the log file.

Armed with those commands, you can try and see where they are in the Django code.

A complete disappearance looks like a recreation of the Model structure, which means that somehow the system did not recognize the data as being there. I am not aware of any Python or Django issues to cause this.

Are you sure you didn't just issue a flush/reset command?

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I will try this now and see if I still get the data loss. –  izen hide Sep 17 '12 at 22:01

I don't fully understand what you mean by

Today accidentally from my home computer I tried to start the django app with python 2.7.3 and something strange happened"

But it is possible that you managed to run syncdb on a system that didn't know that it had already been ran? syncdb does not keep any data.

If you plan to be making schema changes you should look into using South for migrations.

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ok. this could be it. I did run syncdb on the database. But I thought that syncdb only created new tables and it did not alter any existing tables. or am i wrong? –  izen hide Sep 17 '12 at 21:55
    
You are correct, syncdb should not try to do anything with models it has already created. You mentioned that you had run something from a different environment, so I'm throwing this out there as somehow causing syncdb to not know that it had already created said models. In such a case syncdb would overwrite any data you had in there, because it would just drop and recreate those tables completely. With more info we could dig in further to find out why exactly. –  noisewaterphd Sep 17 '12 at 22:08
    
I am trying my best but the data seems to be persisting now. I am unable to recreate the issue. I re-populated the db on my desktop with python 2.6, django 1.4. and did a syncdb. Then on my laptop with python 2.7.3 again I synced the db but nothing the data remained there. Then I dropped the db, recreated it and repopulated it on the desktop (without running syncdb). Instead I issued syncdb on the laptop. Nothing happened again. So, I am still unsure what actually happened there. In what possible ways can I empty only my model tables from manage.py? –  izen hide Sep 17 '12 at 22:53
    
It happened again. It seems like pyUnit test (in eclipse pydev) is the culprit. Can someone please explain this??? –  izen hide Sep 18 '12 at 0:46

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