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I wrote a program which calculates fibonacci numbers. Initially, I couldn't input large numbers because of resource concerns, but now after I have re-written it, it runs at good speeds. However, if I use ints, the numbers turn out negative once I input large numbers. I tried using long, but they wrap around pretty quickly too. If you don't know what I mean, then this code should explain it:

`System.out.println("The 536th fibonacci number: "fib(536));`
`*The 536th fibonacci number: -8757250051716203595*`

Obviously, a negative number makes no sense in this context, so I was wondering how I can make it so it will always work- no wrapping around, no matter what.

EDIT: Problem solved!

import java.math.BigInteger;
public static BigInteger fib(int n)
{
    return fib2h(n,BigInteger.ONE,BigInteger.ONE);
}


public static BigInteger fibh(int n,BigInteger o,BigInteger p)
{
    if(n==1) return o;
    return fib2h(n-1,p,o.add(p));
}
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5 Answers 5

BigInteger would help you achieve what you want.

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You can try BigInteger from java.math.

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you could use java.lang.BigInteger class

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You can try something like following (iterative):

public static BigInteger fib(int n) {
    BigInteger a = BigInteger.ONE;
    BigInteger b = BigInteger.ONE;
    BigInteger c;
    for (int i = 3; i <= n; i++) {
         c = a.add(b);
         a = b;
         b = c;
    }
    return b;
}

See more in http://blog.paulvargas.org/numeros-fibonacci/

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I made it recursive so I don't want an iterative solution... public static long fib(long n) { fibs=new long[(int)n+1]; return fibh(n-2)+fibh(n-1); } public static long fibh(long n) { if(n==1||n==2) return 1; else if(fibs[(int)n]==0) {fibs[(int)n]=fibh(n-2)+fibh(n-1); return fibs[(int)n];} return fibs[(int)n]; } –  faeophyta Sep 18 '12 at 13:13
    
The recursive solution can be problematic because it generates an explosion of calls, which can consume a lot of memory. If you want that, try this: public static BigInteger f(int n) { if (n == 0) return BigInteger.ZERO; if (n == 1) return BigInteger.ONE; return f(n-1).add(f(n-2)); } –  Paul Vargas Sep 18 '12 at 15:16
    
Paul, I don't have an explosion of calls because I wrote it as pasted below. However, I don't know how to integrate BigInteger into my solution. public static int fib(int n) { return fibh(n,1,1); } public static int fib2h(int n,int o,int p) { if(n==1) return o; return fib2h(n-1,p,o+p); } –  faeophyta Sep 19 '12 at 0:21
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I solved my problem! What I did:

import java.math.BigInteger;
public static BigInteger fib(int n)
{
    return fib2h(n,BigInteger.ONE,BigInteger.ONE);
}


public static BigInteger fibh(int n,BigInteger o,BigInteger p)
{
    if(n==1) return o;
    return fib2h(n-1,p,o.add(p));
}
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