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I am using slick for java since a few days and got a serious problem. If i run a completely empty apllication (it just shows the fps) with a solution of 800x600 i get a fps count between 700 and 800. If I now draw an array with 13300 entries as a grid of green and white rectangles, the fps drop to something around 70.

With more entries in the array it becomes really slow. For example in a solution of 1024x768 and an array with 21760 entries the fps drop to 40.

How i draw a single entry:

public void draw(Graphics graphics){
    graphics.setColor(new Color(getColor().getRed(), getColor().getGreen(), getColor().getBlue(), getColor().getAlpha()));

    graphics.fillRect(getPosition().x, getPosition().y, getSize().x, getSize().y);

    Color_ARGB white = new Color_ARGB(Color_ARGB.ColorNames.WHITE);
    graphics.setColor(new Color(white.getRed(), white.getGreen(), white.getBlue(), white.getAlpha()));
}

And this is how I draw the complete array:

public void draw(Graphics graphics) {
    for (int ix = 0; ix < getWidth(); ix++) {
        for (int iy = 0; iy < getHeight(); iy++) {
            getGameGridAt(ix, iy).draw(graphics);
        }
    }
}

In my opinion 21760 is not that much. Is there anything wrong with my code or is slick just too slow to draw so much rectangles?

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

You only want to draw rectangles that are on the screen. If your screen bounds go from 0 to 1024 in the x direction and from 0 to 768 in the y direction, then you only want to loop through rectangles that are inside those bounds and then only draw those rectangles. I can't imagine you are trying to draw 21760 rectangles inside those bounds.

If you are, then try creating one static rectangle and then just try drawing that ONE in all of the different positions you need to draw it at rather than creating a new one every time. For example, in a game I am making, I might have 1000 tiles that are "grass" tiles, but all 1000 of those share the same static texture. So I only need to reference one image rather than each tile creating its own.

Each rectangle can still have a unique state. Just make your own rectangle class and have a static final Image that holds a 5*5 image. Each rectangle will use this image when it needs to be drawn. You can still have unique properties for each rectangle. For example, private Vector2f position, private boolean isAlive, etc

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Actually I am drawing so much rectangles. I am programming Conways Game of Life. And one single field is currently 5*5 pixels. So the grid is 1024/5 wide and 768/5 high. – M0rgenstern Sep 18 '12 at 6:11
    
Try creating one static rectangle and then just try drawing that ONE in all of the different positions you need to draw it at rather than creating a new one every time. For example, in a game I am making, I might have 1000 tiles that are "grass" tiles, but all 1000 of those share the same static texture. So I only need to reference one image rather than each tile creating its own. – theDazzler Sep 18 '12 at 6:42
    
That could be hard. Because every rectangle has a unique state. It can be death or alive. Furthermore every rectangle has a list of its previous states to make it possible to go back to an old state. – M0rgenstern Sep 18 '12 at 8:15
1  
Each rectangle can still have a unique state. Just make your own rectangle class and have a static final Image that holds a 5*5 image. Each rectangle will use this image when it needs to be drawn. You can still have unique properties for each rectangle. For example, private Vector2f position, private boolean isAlive, etc. – theDazzler Sep 18 '12 at 20:06
    
Yes. More or less this was the solution. (I found out because of the slick forum.) The problem is that fillRectangle() is very slow, because it locks an image, draws something and then unlocks the image. The solution was to lock an image before the loop, draw IMAGES (not rectangles) during the loop on this image and unlocking the image after the loop. Thanks for all your help. – M0rgenstern Sep 21 '12 at 7:01

You're probably not going to be able to draw individual rectangles any faster than that.

Games that render millions of polygons per second do so using vertex buffer objects (VBO). For that, you'll probably need to code against the OpenGL API (LWJGL) itself, not a wrapper.

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Not sure if Slick will allow it, but if this thing looks anything like a chessboard grid... you could draw just 4 rectangles, grab them and use the resulting image as a texture for your whole image. I'm not even a java programmer just trying to come up with a solution.

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That is not possible because the rectangles differ in color. And the color can change from time to time. And there is no certain pattern the grid is colored. – M0rgenstern Sep 18 '12 at 6:16
    
@M0rgenstern since the color only changes from time to time draw the grid only once and save the resulting image, on next iterations paint the image and over it just the grid elements that have changed since, if there were any, if the image is changed update your cache. This should significantly reduce the amount of drawing done. And considering that improvements to your code did not affect the performance (from the other answer I gave) that's obviously the bottleneck here. – xception Sep 18 '12 at 9:24

Since you're only repeatedly using just a few colors creating a new Color object for every single one is bound to be slow... use new only once for each different color used and store the re-usable colors somewhere in your class, than call the functions with those, constantly allocating and freeing memory is very slow.

And while this might not be as much a benefit as not using new each time but have you considered caching the results of all those function calls and rewriting code as

public void draw(Graphics graphics) {
    int ixmax = getWidth();
    int iymax = getHeight();
    for (int ix = 0; ix < ixmax; ix++) {
        for (int iy = 0; iy < iymax; iy++) {
            getGameGridAt(ix, iy).draw(graphics);
        }
    }
}

Or if you'd prefer not to declare new variables

public void draw(Graphics graphics) {
    for (int ix = getWidth() - 1; ix >= 0; ix--) {
        for (int iy = getHeight() - 1; iy >= 0; iy--) {
            getGameGridAt(ix, iy).draw(graphics);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I now changed the code in a way that the colors are not created new in every step. But that did not change a thing. – M0rgenstern Sep 18 '12 at 8:25
    
Sorry, I really tried, would have helped normally, maybe java has some mechanism that detects that you reuse them often and doesn't allocate/deallocate them as often :( I really am no java expert, just trying to he helpful, if possible. – xception Sep 18 '12 at 9:03
    
@M0rgenstern if you are familiar with c++ try having a look at how QGraphicsScene (from Qt) manages a very large number of items to draw, description from documentation The QGraphicsScene class provides a surface for managing a large number of 2D graphical items.. It can handle very large sets of items with very good performance by only drawing the ones that are visible, if you look at that code might give you an idea how to draw much less (I suppose since your grid is so large it's not all visible at once) – xception Sep 18 '12 at 9:08
    
Every single rectangle is visible. It should be Conway's Game of Life, so the complete grid just consists of very small rectangles which can be alive or not. And the complete grid is visible at once. – M0rgenstern Sep 18 '12 at 9:42

Just noticed in another answer you have an integral size grid (5x5) ... in this case the fastest way to go about this would seem to be to draw each item a single pixel (you can do this directly in memory using a 2-dimensional array) and scale it to 500% or use it as a texture and draw a single rectangle with it the final size you desire ... should be quite fast. Sorry for all the confusion caused by previous answers, you should have said what you're doing more clearly from the start. If scaling and textures are not available you can still draw in memory using something like this (written in c++, please translate it to java yourself)

for( int x = 0; x < grid.width(); x++ ) {
   for( int y = 0; y < grid.height(); y++ ) {
      image[x*5][y*5] = grid.color[x][y];
      image[x*5][y*5 + 1] = grid.color[x][y];
      image[x*5][y*5 + 2] = grid.color[x][y];
      image[x*5][y*5 + 3] = grid.color[x][y];
      image[x*5][y*5 + 4] = grid.color[x][y];
   }
   memcpy(image[x*5+1], image[x*5], grid.height() * sizeof(image[0][0]) );
   memcpy(image[x*5+2], image[x*5], grid.height() * sizeof(image[0][0]) );
   memcpy(image[x*5+3], image[x*5], grid.height() * sizeof(image[0][0]) );
   memcpy(image[x*5+4], image[x*5], grid.height() * sizeof(image[0][0]) );
}

I'm not sure, but perhaps for graphics the x and y might be represented in the reversed order than used here, so change the code accordingly if it that's the case (you'll figure that out as soon as a few iterations run), also your data is probably structured a bit differently but I think the idea should be clear.

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