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I have several threads running in parallel from Python on a cluster system. Each python thread outputs to a directory mydir. Each script, before outputting checks if mydir exists and if not creates it:

if not os.path.isdir(mydir):
    os.makedirs(mydir)

but this yields the error:

os.makedirs(self.log_dir)                                             
  File "/usr/lib/python2.6/os.py", line 157, in makedirs
mkdir(name,mode)
OSError: [Errno 17] File exists

I suspect it might be due to a race condition, where one job creates the dir before the other gets to it. Is this possible? If so, how can this error be avoided? I'm not sure it's a race condition so was wondering if other issues in Python can cause this odd error.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Any time code can execute between when you check something and when you act on it, you will have a race condition. One way to avoid this (and the usual way in Python) is to just try and then handle the exception

while True:
    mydir = next_dir_name()
    try:
        os.makedirs(mydir)
        break
    except OSError, e:
        if e.errno != 17:
            raise   
        # time.sleep might help here
        pass

If you have a lot of threads trying to make a predictable series of directories this will still raise a lot of exceptions, but you will get there in the end. Better to just have one thread creating the dirs in that case

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Catch the exception and, if the errno is 17, ignore it. That's the only thing you can do if there's a race condition between the isdir and makedirs calls.

However, it could also be possible that a file with the same name exists - in that case os.path.exists would return True but os.path.isdir returns false.

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1  
What about using exist_ok parameter os.makedirs as of Python 3.2? (I'm asking because have never actually used it). –  ovgolovin Sep 17 '12 at 22:44
    
@ovgolovin, looks like that would work ok, but not many us get to just support 3.2 yet :) –  gnibbler Sep 17 '12 at 22:51

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