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int main(int argc, char **argv){

    // If the user does not have the right amount of arguments exit the program and display message
    if(!(argc >= 2)){
        printf("Usage: %s -l -c -w -L <filenames>");
        exit(-1);
    }

    size_t iscFlag = 0;
    size_t islFlag = 0;
    size_t iswFlag = 0;
    size_t isLFlag = 0;
    FILE *src; 
    puts("Work work");  
    // For loop that checks for all the flags
    int i;
    for(i = 1; i < 5; i++){
        if(strcmp(argv[i], "-c") == 0){
            iscFlag = 1;            
        }else if(strcmp(argv[i], "-l") == 0){
            islFlag = 1;
        }else if(strcmp(argv[i], "-w") == 0){
            iswFlag = 1;
        }else if(strcmp(argv[i], "-L") == 0){
            isLFlag = 1;
        }
    }

I'm trying to make a simple for loop that checks for flags to recreate a wc command in a UNIX type terminal. Anyone know what's up with the for loop? I get a segmentation fault on it. There is more code but I'm just posting a part of it.

Thanks in advance.

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2  
OH I'm an idiot. I think I found out what the problem is seconds after posting. I'm just doing ./wc -w filename and so the loop is checking beyond bounds. –  Man Person Sep 17 '12 at 23:02
    
Don't forget the arguments to the printf: you use %s without an argument. Next possible segfault –  ckruse Sep 17 '12 at 23:42

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

With

for(i = 1; i < 5; i++){
    if(strcmp(argv[i], "-c") == 0){

you should ensure that argc >= 5, or the strcmp will receive a NULL pointer when i == argc.

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You're looking at argv[i] when your i goes all the way up to four, but you only check for an argc >= 2. I imagine you'll get a segfault whenever you have three or four arguments, and it will only work when you have five or more.

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for(i = 1; i < 5; i++){
        if(strcmp(argv[i], "-c") == 0){
            iscFlag = 1;
            continue;           
        }else if(strcmp(argv[i], "-l") == 0){
            islFlag = 1;
            continue;
        }else if(strcmp(argv[i], "-w") == 0){
            iswFlag = 1;
            continue;
        }else if(strcmp(argv[i], "-L") == 0){
            isLFlag = 1;
            continue;
        }
        break;
    }

Fixed it with that!

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How does that fix it? If you give it a couple of non-flag arguments and no flag arguments, you're still going to get the segfault. –  João Mendes Sep 17 '12 at 23:06
    
@JoãoMendes Actually he is right. As soon as it finds a non flag argument, it breaks out of the loop. However there's another problem that he's not fixing: there's no check for the null he'd get if the arguments are flags, but not as many to get to i==4 –  Analog File Sep 17 '12 at 23:24
    
@AnalogFile You mean the null he'd get if the arguments aren't flags, but not as many to get to i==4, which is exactly what I said...! :p –  João Mendes Sep 18 '12 at 10:15
    
Nope. I do mean if the arguments ARE flags. If it finds any argument that is NOT a flag, the loop immediately terminates. –  Analog File Sep 18 '12 at 10:21

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