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I have a project structured as

myproject/
         moduleA/
         moduleB/
         moduleC/

myproject has pom.xml as

        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.slf4j</groupId>
            <artifactId>slf4j-api</artifactId>
            <version>1.6.4</version>
            <scope>provided</scope>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>ch.qos.logback</groupId>
            <artifactId>logback-classic</artifactId>
            <version>1.0.3</version>
            <scope>provided</scope>
        </dependency>

Now moduleC needs moduleB code so it references the dependency as

       <dependency>
            <groupId>com.org.myproject</groupId>
            <artifactId>moduleB</artifactId>
            <version>${project.version}</version>
        </dependency>

But when I execute the class in moduleC, it complains

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.NoClassDefFoundError: org/slf4j/LoggerFactory
......
Caused by: java.lang.ClassNotFoundException: org.slf4j.LoggerFactory

This happens when my moduleC class executes moduleB code.

What is that I am doing wrong? how can I fix this?

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How are you packaging the binaries and how are you executing them? The given pom.xml only describes the compile-time dependencies - not how the binaries are packaged. The error message is typically to classpath problems. So the JVM can't find the logback implementation of the LoggerFactory class on the classpath. –  coding.mof Sep 17 '12 at 23:33

2 Answers 2

You are setting your dependencies to 'provided' which means that they won't be included in your runtime classpath. You are basically telling Maven that you will provide these files at runtime, so they are there for compilation, but unless you put them in your classpath manually they won't be there when you run.

Have a look here: http://maven.apache.org/guides/introduction/introduction-to-dependency-mechanism.html#Dependency_Scope for more information on each of the scope levels.

If you specify nothing then the scope will be compile:

Compile is the default scope, used if none is specified. Compile dependencies are available in all classpaths of a project. Furthermore, those dependencies are propagated to dependent projects.

So you can omit your scope tag or explicitly add it as compile and when you run your app the dependencies will be included on the runtime classpath.

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I understand, but how do I fix this issue then? thank you –  daydreamer Sep 18 '12 at 13:06
    
Change it so your dependencies are not marked as "provided"? –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Sep 19 '12 at 9:05

as per comment by @Dave, I did added the following to my pom.xml and things started to work as usual

        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.slf4j</groupId>
            <artifactId>slf4j-api</artifactId>
            <version>1.6.6</version>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>ch.qos.logback</groupId>
            <artifactId>logback-classic</artifactId>
            <version>1.0.6</version>
        </dependency>
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