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import com.google.inject.AbstractModule;
import com.google.inject.Guice;
import com.google.inject.Inject;
import com.google.inject.Injector;

public class GuiceDemo
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        new GuiceDemo().run();
    }

    public void run()
    {
        Injector injector = Guice.createInjector(new EmptyModule());
        DemoInstance demoInstance = injector.getInstance(DemoInstance.class);
        assert(demoInstance.demoUnbound == null);
    }

    public static class EmptyModule extends AbstractModule
    {
        @Override
        protected void configure()
        {
        }
    }

    public static class DemoInstance
    {
        public final DemoUnbound demoUnbound;

        @Inject
        public DemoInstance(DemoUnbound demoUnbound)
        {
            this.demoUnbound = demoUnbound;
        }
    }

    public static class DemoUnbound
    {
    }
}

Can I prevent Guice from providing an instance of DemoUnbound to the constructor of DemoInstance?

In essence I am looking for a way to run Guice in a totally explicit binding mode where injecting an unbound class is an error.

How do you make it an error to Guice inject a class not bound in the Module?

share|improve this question
    
@johncarl thank you for the syntax fix. I didn't like my original code as it was doing the demo from the constructor which is ugly :) I should have checked the code before posting. –  Alain O'Dea Sep 17 '12 at 23:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you use an interface here instead of a concrete class for DemoUnbound, Guice will throw an exception because it cannot find a suitable class to inject:

public class GuiceDemo
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        new GuiceDemo().run();
    }

    public void run()
    {
        Injector injector = Guice.createInjector(new EmptyModule());
        DemoInstance demoInstance = injector.getInstance(DemoInstance.class);
        assert(demoInstance.demoUnbound == null);
    }

    public static class EmptyModule extends AbstractModule
    {
        @Override
        protected void configure()
        {
        }
    }

    public static class DemoInstance
    {
        public final DemoUnbound demoUnbound;

        @Inject
        public DemoInstance(DemoUnbound demoUnbound)
        {
            this.demoUnbound = demoUnbound;
        }
    }

    public interface DemoUnbound
    {
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
A valid solution. I should have clarified my intent. The problem is I want to prevent programmers from injecting public classes that already exist. Beyond compiler boundaries I still can't see a solution to this. I suppose the solution is code review :S –  Alain O'Dea Sep 17 '12 at 23:48
    
I think I need a little clarification. What do you mean by: "I want to prevent programmers from injecting public classes that already exist" –  johncarl Sep 17 '12 at 23:51
    
I want to make it so that the code I provide above doesn't work. I would like it so that I was forced to have "bind(DemoInstance.class, DemoInstance.class)" to make it work. Does Guice support this? Basically this has been identified as a deadly flaw and is leading to a possible wholesale removal of Guice from our code. We want to explicitly control exactly the types that can be injected. –  Alain O'Dea Sep 18 '12 at 0:25
    
Honestly this sounds like a strange request. Why is this a deadly flaw? What is preventing devs from just executing this: DemoInstance instance = new DemoInstance(new DemoUnbound()) ? –  johncarl Sep 18 '12 at 2:31
    
I agree with you. I will make the case that a code review can easily pick up inappropriate constructor parameters. DI frameworks are a hard sell where I am unfortunately and it seems that people can be inventive in arguing against them :) –  Alain O'Dea Sep 18 '12 at 4:27

Try putting binder().requireExplicitBindings(); in your Module. It won't keep you from injecting concrete classes, but it will require a module to include bind(DemoUnbound.class); to make it more obvious.

Read the Binder docs for more information.

share|improve this answer
    
This sounds like it fits the bill... I was unaware of this configuration. –  johncarl Sep 18 '12 at 4:13

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