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I'm namely a C++ programmer, and in C++ I could do something like this:

class SuperSuper
{
    virtual void newItem()=0;
}

class SubSuperA:public SuperSuper
{
     virtual void newItem()
     {
         //do something
     }
}

class SubSuperB:public SuperSuper
{
     virtual void newItem()
     {
         //do something different (disappear! :)
     }
}

template <class T>
class SubSub:public T
{
    virtual void newItem()
    {
         T::newItem();
         //do a third thing
    }
}

I want to do this in Java, however I'm getting the feeling that it (at least directly) isn't possible

I set up the first three classes easily in Java as follows:

public abstract class SuperSuper
{
    abstract void newItem(Item item);
}

public class SubSuperA extends SuperSuper
{
    @Override void newItem(Item item)
    {
        //stuff
    }
}

public class SubSuperB extends SuperSuper
{
    @Override void newItem(Item item)
    {
        //other stuff
    }
}
//SubSuperC,D,etc

And currently am implementing the fourth like so:

SubSuperA sa=new SubSuperA() {
    @Override public void newItem(Item item)
    {
        super.newItem(item);
        //A lot of stuff that will be changing constantly throughout development
    }
};

SubSuperB sb=new SubSuperB() {
    @Override public void newItem(Item item)
    {
        super.newItem(item);
        //A lot of stuff that will be changing constantly throughout development
    }
};

Please note that both of the overrides are of the same function. No matter what SubSuper* it is based on, the replacement newItem() is identical. Obviously this would be a nightmare to maintain. I was hoping I could just declare a SubSub class like this

 public class SubSub<T> extends T {
    @Override public void newItem(Item item)
    {
        super.newItem(item);
        //A lot of stuff that will be changing constantly throughout development
    }
 }

that I could just instantiate like this

 SubSub ss=new SubSub<SubSuperA>

etc... but this errors in java:

"Cannot refer to the type parameter T as a supertype."

I looked around based on that error and found Extend from Generic Supertype? which claims that what I want to do isn't possible using that method.

What I actually need to do: I have a platform agnostic twitter client that just handles receiving tweets, storing them etc. It has an abstract Column class (SuperSuper) that I can extend for various different types of columns (SubSuper) (home timeline, mentions, etc) and each filters out what tweets they want to display in newItem(). I want to be able to plug various GUIs into it for different platforms, and I need the client to call a GUI specific function (SubSub) to handle adding each individual tweet to the GUI library. Having a GUI specific class that can extend any Column derived class would be the ideal solution

Since apparently this direct implementation isn't possible in Java, I am wondering if there is some syntactic trickery that will achieve something fairly similar, or if I should just go off creating an interface that will be stored and called by SuperSuper and SuperSub* and implemented by my GUI handler instead of SubSub.

share|improve this question
    
So, you have a class A, classes M and P derive from (extend) A, what's the twist? (you can define a method in A as abstract as long as you define the class A as abstract, which will require non abstract M and P classes to implement that method) – Mark Elliot Sep 18 '12 at 1:51
    
I can define M and P just fine. The problem is I want to make SubSub which can extend either A, M, OR P at the time of instantiation. In my java implementation, which has A, M and P defined already and working, including all the abstract stuff – zacaj Sep 18 '12 at 2:07
    
Hm, I'm pretty sure you can't do that -- could you talk about your use-case a bit more? For instance, if you just want to guarantee that A, M, P, and Z (your "SubSub") could all implement a common interface, which would guarantee that the defined spec method is available. – Mark Elliot Sep 18 '12 at 2:38
    
M,P, and an unknown amount of other classes extend A (or implement A, etc, I'm flexible), and I want to be able to write Z (which overrides one function in A (and consequently MP)) (or just newItem()) once and then be able to override newItem in MP when I do new M() or new P() – zacaj Sep 18 '12 at 2:41
    
I was hoping you might update your question with something more concrete. It's unlikely the abstracted inheritance you're talking about just isn't possible. You can't extend arbitrary classes at runtime (= instantiation in Java). You can, through something called Dynamic Proxy, provide runtime implementations for interfaces (including stitching several together, but there wouldn't be a hierarchical relationship). – Mark Elliot Sep 18 '12 at 2:45

Templates are possible using Java's generics. However, in Java, interfaces are far more popular than inheritance. This is because Java doesn't support multiple inheritance.

In C++, you can extend multiple classes.

class X : public A, public B, private C { }

Because C++ doesn't make any distinction between virtual and non-virtual classes, only virtual and non-virtual members, there's no formal distinction between classes which may or may not have virtual methods.

Java on the other hand, has three distinct class types:

  • Concrete (completely non-virtual, all methods are concrete)
  • Abstract (partially virtual, partially non-virtual)
  • Interface (completely virtual, no concrete methods)

In Java, virtual methods are called abstract methods, so I'll call them that here on out.

Java also has generics. Generics are similar to templates syntactically, but completely different in terms of the implementation. I'll leave the implementation research to you (the keyword to use in your search is "erasure").

Generics are declared on the class. For example, Java's equivalent to the C++ vector is the ArrayList class. Its use is very similar:

List<String> strs = new ArrayList<String>();

Here, List is a sort of super-type of ArrayList. List is an interface, and ArrayList implements it. List itself declares a generic type in its declaration like so:

public interface List<E> ... {

    // ...

    E get(int index);

    // ...
}

Notice how get returns E. Here, E isn't concretely defined. It's a generic type, and in this case, anything can be used in its place, String, Object, Boolean, your own classes, etc.

ArrayList implements List, and also declares a generic type:

public ArrayList<E> implements List<E>, ... {

    // ...

    public E get(int index) {
        // bounds check
        return elements[i];
    }

    // ...
}

You can also restrict types on generics using type bounding. This is a little beyond the scope of this, since what you want isn't really generics. You want interfaces.

In your example, you would first declare an interface with newItem.

public interface A {
    void newItem();
}

Every method has to come from a concrete implementation or an interface, hence the need for this interface. Specifically, this interface would be equivalent to SuperSuper. It's a fully virtual class (interface). Now for your classes:

public class B implements A {
    @Override
    public void newItem() {
        // Do something
    }
}

public class C implements A {
    @Override
    public void newItem() {
        // Do something else
    }
}

Your last bit there is a little confusing to someone like me without much experience in C++, but I assume what you're saying there is you want to create a template type with a newItem method. In Java, this would be another implementation of the A interface or you could extend B or C and override their methods.

public class D extends B {
    @Override
    public void newItem() {
        // And yet another something else
    }
}

Then using something with a newItem method is as simple as:

A a = new B(); // or "new C()" or "new D()"
a.newItem();

Just like how you can say

SuperSuper* a = new SubSuperA();

In Java, you can do the same thing with interfaces, abstract classes, and concrete classes, like I did above.

So I think interfaces are the solution to your problem. I'd highly recommend reading up on how interfaces are used in Java. They provide powerful typing with the absence of multiple inheritance. I'll find a couple links real quick.

Hope those help. Let me know if you need any clarification.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this is helpful. The problem is that I'd need to define D multiple times for each subclass of A (B,C,Q,H,etc), even though there would only be one identical version of D.newItem() that they all would use (and I'd need to update/synchronize!) Is there a way to just declare D.newItem() once and override the versions in all of A's subclasses? – zacaj Sep 18 '12 at 2:26
    
@zacaj It sounds like you might want to try a different design approach. Since Java doesn't support multiple inheritance, you can't extend more than one class, which would be required for what you're trying. Maybe you should take a look at the strategy pattern (link 1, link 2). This allows you to switch out implementations at runtime. – Brian Sep 18 '12 at 15:26
    
This isn't multiple inheritance. Each instance of D would only inherit from one sub class – zacaj Sep 18 '12 at 15:42
    
But it each D would be inheriting from a different class, is my point, which means for every B, C, etc. you would need exactly one D class. I didn't mean multiple inheritance per se as much as I meant D cannot be an instance of both B and C at the same time or even at different times. (Though they can all be an instance of A, which is why I thought interfaces would be a reasonable solution, if that makes any sense) – Brian Sep 18 '12 at 15:46

You can't.

C++ templates are really source code "templates". When you have a template class or function, for every type used as the type argument, the compiler effectively generates ("instantiates") a separate copy of the source code, with the type parameter replaced by the actual type argument. So for example, vector<int> and vector<string> are completely separate types and the compiled code for their functions are likely separate as well (just as if they were separate types).

That's why it's possible to do things like inherit from the type parameter. To the compiler, it just substitutes whatever type argument for T everywhere it sees it. The resulting code is valid, so it works.

Generics in Java are very different. There is just one copy of compiled code for a generic class or method. That one version of compiled code must, at the same time, work for any possible type parameter (existing or future) that is within its bounds.

So think about what it would mean if you could do what you are suggesting. There is just one copy of the compiled code for the class SubSub, and it inherits, well, T, whatever it is. So it must simultaneously inherit every type. How is that possible? A class can only have one, definite, parent class.

share|improve this answer

Based on your Java code, I think you really want the decorator pattern:

public class SubSub<T extends SuperSuper> extends SuperSuper {

     private final Class<T> clazz;

     public SubSub(Class<T> clazz){
         this.clazz = clazz;
     }

     @Override
     public void newItem(Item item){
          T sup = clazz.newInstance();
          sup.newItem(item);
          // other stuff
     }
}

With invokations like:

SubSub<SubSuperA> foo = new SubSub<SubSuperA>(SubSuperA.class);

You can get rid of the generics entirely, if, say, you wanted to just pass the name of the class as a parameter:

public class SubSub extends SuperSuper {

     private final SuperSuper _super;

     public <T extends SuperSuper> SubSub(Class<T> clazz){
         _super = clazz.newInstance();
     }

     @Override
     public void newItem(Item item){
          _super.newItem(item);
          sup.newItem(item);
          // other stuff
     }
}

With instantiations of the form:

SubSub foo = new SubSub(SubSuperA.class);

or:

SubSub foo = new SubSub((Class<SuperSuper>) Class.forName("SubSuperA"));
share|improve this answer

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